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WD Editors Are Writers Too: Meet Robert Lee Brewer, Senior Content Editor of Writer's Market

All the editors on Writer’s Digest staff aren’t just 9-5 editors, we are also writers and storytellers—which is why we are so passionate about writing and publishing. “WD Editors Are Writers Too” is a feature on this blog to give you a sneak peek at the folks who lead the WD community—including their quirks, what inspires them and what they are writing outside of the Writer’s Digest world. Today’s pick is Writer’s Market Senior Content Editor Robert Lee Brewer, who loves writing, social media, connecting with others and the Cincinnati Reds as much as I do. He was also once named Poet Laureate of the Blogosphere and can grow a monster beard in like a week.

All the editors on Writer’s Digest staff aren’t just 9-5 editors, we are also writers and storytellers—which is why we are so passionate about writing and publishing. “WD Editors Are Writers Too” is a feature on this blog to give you a sneak peek at the folks who lead the WD community—including their quirks, what inspires them and what they are writing outside of the Writer’s Digest world. Today’s pick is Writer’s Market Senior Content Editor Robert Lee Brewer, who loves writing, social media, connecting with others and the Cincinnati Reds as much as I do. He was also once named Poet Laureate of the Blogosphere and can grow a monster beard in like a week.

Times Square

Robert Lee Brewer

Senior Content Editor, Writer’s Market

I joined Writer's Digest in: January of 2000 as an intern

I knew I wanted to be a writer when: I was in high school.

The book that inspires me most is: As a person, The Little Prince, by Antoine de Saint-Exupery; as a writer, Paterson, by William Carlos Williams

Favorite moment as a writer/editor: Participating as a National Feature Poet at the Austin International Poetry Festival earlier this year; non-stop poetry for four days.

Worst moment as a writer/editor: There’s nothing worse than making a mistake on my end that makes someone else look bad. Each mistake that I’ve missed over the years (large and small) cause me great pain. The rational side of me knows they happen, but there’s nothing rational about making a living as an editor.

Any background info you'd like to share: My writing path started in high school. I was trying to woo a girl, and it worked. But that initial love poem eventually turned into a composition notebook filled with other poems. Before I knew it, I was self-publishing my own fanzine that included poetry, fiction, comics, music reviews, local band interviews, and more. Without realizing it, I’d already gotten into publishing. I think those experiences in high school really helped shape my future in publishing and media.

Personal writing project I’m currently working on: I’ve been putting a lot of energy into my personal blog, My Name Is Not Bob. The work has been paying off, and I’m really excited about my editorial goals for that blog in 2012. Also, I’m always poeming and submitting those poems to publications. I’m currently working on the final chapbook in a self-published trilogy, which will combine to form a Voltron-like super collection of poetry. One can aspire, I guess.

Follow me on Twitter: @BrianKlems
Read my Dad blog: TheLifeOfDad.com
Sign up for my free weekly eNewsletter: WD Newsletter

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