Conference Code of Conduct

Here is Writer's Digest's code of conduct for attendees, speakers, agents, sponsors, volunteers, and staff at our conferences and events (virtual and live).
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Writer’s Digest is committed to delivering inclusive educational programs that represent the diverse community of writers, editors, and other publishing professionals who share a single mission: entertaining and enlightening readers of all types and interests with compelling stories across all genres.

All attendees, speakers, agents, sponsors, volunteers, and staff at our conferences and events (virtual and live) are required to agree with the following code of conduct, and we expect cooperation from all participants to help ensure a safe, harassment-free environment for everybody.

Harassment and unacceptable behavior includes:

  • Offensive verbal comments related to gender, gender identity and expression, age, sexual orientation, disability, physical appearance, body size, race, ethnicity, religion
  • Deliberate intimidation, stalking, following, photography or recording without consent
  • Sustained disruption of talks or other events
  • Inappropriate or non-consensual physical contact, unwelcome sexual attention

Participants asked to stop any harassing behavior are expected to comply immediately. Writer's Digest has a zero tolerance policy. If a participant engages in harassing behavior, Writer’s Digest staff will take any action they deem appropriate, including warning the offender or immediate expulsion from the premises (including virtual platforms) with no refund.

If you are being harassed, notice that someone else is being harassed, or have any other concerns, please contact a member of the Writer’s Digest staff immediately. Our staff can be identified as they'll be wearing branded clothing and/or badges and will make their appearance known/visible on the online platform.

WD staff will be happy to help participants contact hotel/venue security or local law enforcement, provide escorts, or otherwise assist those experiencing harassment to feel safe for the duration of the conference. We value your attendance, and more importantly, your safety.

This code of conduct applies to all official Writer’s Digest conference and event spaces (virtual and live), including registration, panels, meetings, book room, hospitality suite, website, and our social media accounts. The code also applies to social events, such as receptions, breakfasts/lunches, ceremonies, auctions, and book signings.

Writer's Digest Novel Writing Conference
Writer's Digest Annual Conference

Questions?

Contact us at writersdigestconference@aimmedia.com.

Original source and credit: http://2012.jsconf.us/#/about & The Ada Initiative

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