WD Editors Are Writers Too: Meet Marielle Murphy, Assistant Editor of Writer’s Market - Writer's Digest

WD Editors Are Writers Too: Meet Marielle Murphy, Assistant Editor of Writer’s Market

All the editors on Writer’s Digest staff aren’t just 9-5 editors, we are also writers and storytellers—which is why we are so passionate about writing and publishing. “WD Editors Are Writers Too” is a new column on this blog to give you a sneak peek at the folks who lead the WD community—including their quirks, what inspires them and what they are writing outside of the Writer’s Digest world. Today’s pick is WD Assistant Editor Marielle Murphy who is funny, smart and tolerates the occasional Klemsquake1.
Author:
Publish date:

All the editors on Writer’s Digest staff aren’t just 9-5 editors, we are also writers and storytellers—which is why we are so passionate about writing and publishing. “WD Editors Are Writers Too” is a new column on this blog to give you a sneak peek at the folks who lead the WD community—including their quirks, what inspires them and what they are writing outside of the Writer’s Digest world. Today’s pick is Writer's Market Assistant Editor Marielle Murphy who is funny, smart and tolerates the occasional Klemsquake1.

mariellemurphy

Marielle Murphy

Assistant Editor, Writer’s Market

I joined Writer's Digest in: May 2011.

I knew I wanted to be a writer when: Well I was never good at math and I always loved writing, but I knew I wanted to pursue a career in writing when I was the head editor of my yearbook. All that editing and proofreading and writing blurbs was awesome.

The book that inspires me most is: Oh jeez there’s so many!! Can I just tell you my very favorite book ever? It’s Norwegian Wood by Haruki Murakami. I absolutely love the way he writes.

Favorite moment as a writer/editor: Every time I finish a piece and I can read through it and feel proud. Sorry for being such a cheeseball.

Worst moment as a writer/editor: I’ve had to interview some really “interesting” people. One person I interviewed was quite famous and was really rude and unhelpful and getting him to talk was like pulling teeth. So, that sucked.

Any background info you'd like to share: I love band aids. I think they are the cure to everything. I check cuteoverload.com every day (you DO NOT want to hear my “talking to wittle tiny animals voice,” I promise). I am completely fascinated by: Dinosaurs, the Holocaust, sharks, and Charles Manson. (Whatever you guys he is so smart but so crazy.) I get really irritated when people don’t use the right ‘their,’ ‘there’ or ‘they’re.’ It’s not that tough, world, get it together! Also, I don’t know how to ride a bike.

Personal writing project I'm currently working on: I’m working on a personal blog. The concept is pretty silly- it’s about my dreams. They’re crazy. They’ve always been really bizarre and I was going to start journaling them when my oh-so-hip mother suggested I blog them instead. Boom.

1A "Klemsquake" is an earthquake-like shaking of the office floor caused by Brian A. Klems' subconscious (and uncontrollable) leg-bouncing. Fortunately, to date, there have been no recordable injuries.

Follow me on Twitter: @BrianKlems
Read my Dad blog: TheLifeOfDad.com
Sign up for my free weekly eNewsletter: WD Newsletter

wd-Brian-web-19.jpg
plot_twist_story_prompts_fight_or_flight_robert_lee_brewer

Plot Twist Story Prompts: Fight or Flight

Every good story needs a nice (or not so nice) turn or two to keep it interesting. This week, it's fighting time.

Garfield

Vintage WD: 10 Rules for Suspense Fiction

John Grisham once admitted that this article from 1973 helped him write his thrillers. In it, author Brian Garfield shares his go-to advice for creating great suspense fiction.

Pennington_10:21

The Chaotically Seductive Path to Persuasive Copy

In this article, author, writing coach, and copywriter David Pennington teaches you the simple secrets of excellent copywriting.

Grinnell_Literary Techniques

Using Literary Techniques in Narrative Journalism

In this article, author Dustin Grinnell examines Jon Franklin’s award-winning article Mrs. Kelly’s Monster to help writers master the use of literary techniques in narrative journalism.

Poetry Prompt

Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 545

Every Wednesday, Robert Lee Brewer shares a prompt and an example poem to get things started on the Poetic Asides blog. This week, write a cleaning poem.

new_agent_alert_amy_collins_talcott_notch_literary_services

New Agent Alert: Amy Collins of Talcott Notch Literary Services

New literary agent alerts (with this spotlight featuring Amy Collins of Talcott Notch Literary Services) are golden opportunities for new writers because each one is a literary agent who is likely building his or her client list.

5_tips_for_writing_scary_stories_simone_st_james_horror_novels_hauntings

5 Tips for Writing Scary Stories and Horror Novels

Bestselling and award-winning author Simone St. James shares five tips for writing scary stories and horror novels that readers will love to fear.

on_vs_upon_vs_up_on_grammar_rules_robert_lee_brewer

On vs. Upon vs. Up On (Grammar Rules)

Learn when to use on vs. upon vs. up on with Grammar Rules from the Writer's Digest editors, including a few examples of correct usages.