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WD Poetic Form Challenge: Treochair Winner

The Writer’s Digest Poetic Form Challenge (this time a treochair) is an opportunity for poets to try a form and for one (or more) of those poems to end up in Writer’s Digest magazine.

The Writer’s Digest Poetic Form Challenge (this time a treochair) is an opportunity for poets to try a form and for one (or more) of those poems to end up in Writer’s Digest magazine.

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Here are the results of the Writer’s Digest Poetic Form Challenge for the treochair along with a Top 10 list. If you'd like to participate in a challenge, you can try the zejel by clicking here.

Read all of them here.

Here is the winning treochair:

Weekend at the Beach, by Lelawattee Manoo-Rahming

Filigrees,
lacy curls of quiet coves,
frill the shallow blue-green sea.

Parallax:
silver bird and sailboat white -
a scene that cannot be faxed.

Paper nests,
open combs and brood-filled cells,
marvel not, they're stinging pests.

At sunset,
when sunlight morphs into dusk,
slaps start: mosquito roulette.

No bird songs
underscore the new moon night
melodied by moaning gongs.

Troubled dreams;
scritching of unseen creatures;
eyes dance open in sun beams.

*****

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*****

Congratulations, Lelawattee! I liked the balance between the beauty and relaxation of a weekend at the beach propped up against pests and troubled dreams. Plus, I really dug the first line of each stanza, including "filigrees," "parallax," and "paper nests."

Here’s my Top 10 list:

  1. Weekend at the Beach, by Lelawattee Manoo-Rahming
  2. "Mystic Moon," by Connie L. Peters
  3. Atonement Times, by William Preston
  4. Mythical Maiden, by Lisa L. Stead
  5. Without Hope, by Karen Wilson
  6. Book Addict, by Eric Overby
  7. Hush Hour, by Tracy Davidson
  8. Weatherwise, by Jane Shlensky
  9. morning melodrama, by Candace Kubinec
  10. Evening to Morning, by Tina Cockerill

Congratulations to everyone in the Top 10! And to everyone who wrote a treochair!

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