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WD Poetic Form Challenge: Ya-du

The WD Poetic Form Challenge is your opportunity to write and share a poem (ya-du this time around) for a chance to get published in the Poetic Asides column in Writer’s Digest.

The WD Poetic Form Challenge is your opportunity to write and share a poem (ya-du this time around) for a chance to get published in the Poetic Asides column in Writer’s Digest.

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As we wind down the huitain challenge, let's get a new WD Poetic Form Challenge started. This time around, we’ll write the ya-du.

Find the rules for writing the ya-du here. It’s a Burmese five-liner with an intricate rhyme scheme.

So start writing them and sharing here on the blog (this specific post) for a chance to be published in Writer’s Digest magazine–as part of the Poetic Asides column. (Note: You have to log in to the site to post comments/poems; creating an account is free.)

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Build an Audience for Your Poetry!

Build an Audience for Your Poetry tutorial

While your focus as a poet will always be on refining your craft, why not cultivate a following along the way? With the multitude of social networking opportunities available today, it’s never been easier to connect with other poetry enthusiasts. Within minutes, you can set up a blog and share your poems and insights with like-minded readers.

Discover how to expand your readership and apply it to your poetry sharing goals today!

Click to continue.

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Here’s how the challenge works:

  • Challenge is free. No entry fee.
  • The winner (and sometimes a runner-up or two) will be featured in a future edition of Writer’s Digest magazine as part of the Poetic Asides column.
  • Deadline 11:59 p.m. (Atlanta, GA time) on March 31, 2020.
  • Poets can enter as many ya-du (or ya-dus?) as they wish. The more “work” you make for me the better, but remember: I’m judging on quality, not quantity.
  • All poems should be previously unpublished. If you have a specific question about your specific situation, just send me an email at rbrewer@aimmedia.com. Or just write a new ya-du. They’re fun to write; I promise.
  • I will only consider ya-du shared in the comments below. It gets too confusing for me to check other posts, go to other blogs, etc.
  • Speaking of posting, if this is your first time, your comment may not appear immediately. However, it should appear within a day (or 3–if shared on the weekend). So just hang tight, and it should appear eventually. If not, send me an email at the address above.
  • Please include your name as you would like it to appear in print. If you don’t, I’ll be forced to use your user/screen name, which might be something like HaikuPrincess007 or MrLineBreaker. WD has a healthy circulation, so make it easy for me to get your byline correct.
  • Finally–and most importantly–be sure to have fun!
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