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WD Poetic Form Challenge: Rondine Winner

Here are the results of the Writer’s Digest Poetic Form Challenge for the rondine along with a Top 10 list. Look for a new challenge later this week.

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Read all of them here.

Here is the winning rondine:

The Memory Store, by Taylor Graham

It's all swept clean, Main Street seven o'clock.
Nothing's open yet, as rain turns to snow.
I'm walking yesterday-town, Antiques Row.
A pewter tray, a stoneware pickling crock.
That grandfather rocker long ceased its rock.
A feather boa from decades ago.
It's all swept clean,

sidewalk's ready for morning, key in lock.
There's a sewing basket--no thread to sew.
Old portrait--how the eye has lost its glow.
Surprised by time, age, or memory block,
it's all swept clean.

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Build an Audience for Your Poetry!

Build an Audience for Your Poetry tutorial

Learn how to find more readers for your poetry with the Build an Audience for Your Poetry tutorial! In this 60-minute tutorial, poets will learn how to connect with more readers online, in person, and via publication.

Poets will learn the basic definition of a platform (and why it’s important), tools for cultivating a readership, how to define goals and set priorities, how to find readers without distracting from your writing, and more!

Click to continue.

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Congratulations, Taylor! I love it when a poem's content seems to mirror the poetic form's constraints. Such is the case with "The Memory Store."

Here’s my Top 10 list:

  1. The Memory Store, by Taylor Graham
  2. Sweet Pineapple, by Lelawattee Manoo-Rahming
  3. October Mourning, by Sari Grandstaff
  4. Puss at My Boots, by William Preston
  5. Cause/Effect, by barbara_y
  6. Simple Magic, by Jane Shlensky
  7. Every Single Time, by Tracy Davidson
  8. Triolet?, by Moira Nicholson
  9. It's Not Too Late, by Nurit Israeli
  10. A Rondine for a Rondine, by Alice Stainer

Congratulations to everyone in the Top 10! And to everyone who wrote a rondine!

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Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer’s Digest Writing Community, which means he maintains this blog, edits a couple Market Books (Poet’s Market and Writer’s Market), writes a poetry column for Writer’s Digest magazine, leads online education, speaks around the country on publishing and poetry, and a lot of other fun writing-related stuff.

He loves learning new (to him) poetic forms and trying out new poetic challenges. He is also the author of Solving the World’s Problems.

Follow him on Twitter @RobertLeeBrewer.

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