Echo Verse: Poetic Forms

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Last week's form (treochair) had some wild rhymes. This week's form is a little more straight forward. Bring on echo verse!

Echo Verse Poems

Unlike many of the poetic forms we examine on this blog, echo verse has a pretty simple rule: Repeat the end syllable(s) of each line. No other rules.

There are two ways to do this: Repeat the ending syllable(s) at the end of the same line (as in my example below); or repeat the ending syllable(s) on its own line directly beneath each line. I'll include a variant example below.

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Here’s my attempt at Echo Verse:

something to talk about, by Robert Lee Brewer

Is there anything to know? No!
Or a person to betray? A
man is doomed by other men; men
find solace in nothing; nothing
leads to what no one can know. No,
I'd rather find something something.

Here’s my variant attempt at Echo Verse:

something to talk about, by Robert Lee Brewer

Is there anything to know?
No!

Or a person to betray?
A

man is doomed by other men;
men

find solace in nothing;
nothing

leads to what no one can know.
No,

I'd rather find something
something.

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Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer’s Digest Writing Community and author of Solving the World’s Problems (Press 53). He kind of likes repeating himself at the end of lines (lines). Follow him on Twitter @RobertLeeBrewer.