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WD Poetic Form Challenge: Ya-du Winner

Learn the winner and Top 10 list for the Writer’s Digest Poetic Form Challenge for the ya-du.

Here are the results of the Writer's Digest Poetic Form Challenge for the ya-du along with a Top 10 list. (Hopefully, we'll open up the next challenge next Monday.)

Usually, I would link back to the original post to read all the original poems, but we can't do that for this challenge. However, feel free to share your ya-du poems in the comments below.

Here is the winning ya-du:

"Return," by William Preston

From a grey sky
blackbirds fly back,
defying snow
in their slow flight;
bestowing spring as the sky grows bright;

urging the sun
to warm running
brooks underneath
the leaf sheathing;
bequeathing green for when robins sing.

*****

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*****

Congratulations, William! This poem is not only technically correct, but it's also a beautiful, lyrical, and visual tribute to the return of spring.

Here’s my Top 10 list:

  1. Return, by William Preston
  2. Waiting for Summer, by Lelawattee Manoo-Rahming
  3. Seasons, by Nurit Israeli
  4. Year in a Honshu Garden Ya-du, by Margaret Fiske
  5. Seasons of Pandemic, by Jane Shlensky
  6. January 27, by Taylor Graham
  7. Rhode Island, by Sari Grandstaff
  8. Magical Fantasy, by Catherine Martin
  9. On a Clear Evening, by Lisa L. Stead
  10. Awaiting Spring, by Sara McNulty

Congratulations to everyone in the Top 10! And to everyone who wrote a ya-du!

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