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WD Poetic Form Challenge: Nonet Winner

I have to admit I wasn't sure whether to use the nonet for a WD Poetic Form Challenge at first. The main thing I worried about were those final three lines of three, two, and one syllables respectively. I wondered how much variety there could possibly be, but I was pleasantly surprised by the nonets that were entered. In fact, the top 10 was hard to pick--yet again.

Here's the winning nonet:

Dark in the Woods, by Ina Roy-Faderman

The black crow descends on dreadful wings,
blocks the sunlight, deadens the air.
No gentle breezes to clear
my tangled webs of thought.
Instead they collect
in still corners.
Dark descends.
Black dog
barks.

*****

Please congratulate Ina on her winning poem!

Then, check out the other nonet poems, especially looking out for my top 10 list.

  1. Dark in the Woods, by Ina Roy-Faderman
  2. When Testosterone Starts Kicking In, by Laurie Kolp
  3. Geometry, by Bruce Niedt
  4. Accelerando! Something Stirs!, by Marie Elena Good
  5. Nine Ladies Dancing, by Nancy Posey
  6. Snapdragons, by Tracy Davidson
  7. Risking It All, by Rob Halpin
  8. Hot Soup, by Michael Grove
  9. Mammogram, by Marie Elena Good
  10. Thinking Place, by Connie Peters

As you'll see from reading the whole, there were many great nonets that fell outside my top 10 list. Congratulations to everyone who made the top 10!

I hope to see everyone for our next challenge!

*****

Follow me on Twitter @robertleebrewer

*****

Check out Writer's Digest magazine!

The winning poems of these challenges end up in the pages of Writer's Digest magazine.

Subscribe to Writer's Digest today!

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