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WD Poetic Form Challenge: Clogyrnach Winner

Here are the results of the Writer’s Digest Poetic Form Challenge for clogyrnach. There were a lot of great poems, but only 10 can be finalists and just one can win.

Read all the clogyrnachs here.

Here is the winner:

Premonition, by William Preston

It is a dark, unstormy night
with stars competing for the right
to capture my eye
and then, by and by,
I espy
a strange sight:

a murder of crows in the sky,
eclipsing the stars as they fly,
and there, from their height,
they loose subtle fright;
a ghost flight
trending nigh.

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Congratulations again, William! I enjoyed the rhythm of so many of the clogyrnachs, but I loved the dark mystery in "Premonition."

Here’s a complete look at my Top 10 list:

  1. Premonition, by William Preston
  2. Young Girl Plays Old-Time, by Nancy Posey
  3. Words for Sale, by Joslyn Chase
  4. Non-Fashionista, by Candace Kubinec
  5. The Minuet of June, by William Preston
  6. Evening, Reservoir Street, by Taylor Graham
  7. Regret, by Jane Shlensky
  8. Savvy Shopper, by Ruth Y. Nott
  9. The Sixty-Four Thousand Dollar Question, by G. Smith
  10. "Last night the western welkin shone," by Sasha A. Palmer

Congratulations to everyone in the Top 10! And to everyone who wrote clogyrnachs!

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Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer’s Digest Writing Community, which means he maintains this blog, edits a couple Market Books (Poet’s Market and Writer’s Market), writes a poetry column for Writer’s Digest magazine, leads online education, speaks around the country on publishing and poetry, and a lot of other fun writing-related stuff.

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He loves learning new (to him) poetic forms and trying out new poetic challenges. He is also the author of Solving the World’s Problems.

Follow him on Twitter @RobertLeeBrewer.

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