Best Poetry Posts of 2018

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There are people who like year-end lists, and those who don't. I happen to like them. And I thought it'd be fun to compile the best poetry posts of 2018 on WritersDigest.com.

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These posts weren't necessarily posted in 2018. But they are the poetry-related posts with the most unique page views during the year. So some of them may be oldies, but they're all goodies (according to website traffic anyway).

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Master Poetic Forms!

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Learn how to write sestina, shadorma, haiku, monotetra, golden shovel, and more with The Writer’s Digest Guide to Poetic Forms, by Robert Lee Brewer.

This e-book covers more than 40 poetic forms and shares examples to illustrate how each form works. Discover a new universe of poetic possibilities and apply it to your poetry today!

Click to continue.

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The Best Poetry Posts of 2018

  1. The 20 Best Poems for Kids. The most popular poetry-related post mentions 20 of my favorite poems for kids, and I provide links when available. They're categorized as Short Poems for Kids, Funny Poems for Kids, and Rhyming Poems for Kids.
  2. 5 Tips on How to Write a Poem. If the Poetic Asides blog has a calling card, it is probably the poetry prompts shared throughout the year and the poem-a-day challenges in April and November. Well, this post shares some strategies for generating poems with or without a prompt at any time on your own.
  3. List of 86 Poetic Forms for Poets. Number three on the poetry list is one that I cherish: My mega-list of poetic forms. There are currently 86 on there, but my goal is to eventually eclipse 100. I better get busy in 2019!
  4. 37 Common Poetry Terms. This is a handy little guide to common poetry terms that might be flung about at a poetry party. Words like anapest, enjambment, and septet are defined.
  5. Sample Cover Letters for Poetry Submissions. This may be the oldest post on this list, but it has staying power. In it, I share my strategy for writing cover letters when I submit individual groups of poems. There's nothing groundbreaking here, but it shows how to avoid getting in the way of your poems.
  6. Best Opening Poetry Lines. This post shares some of my favorite opening lines of poems. Then, it discusses the importance of opening lines. Finally, several poets share their favorite openers in the comments section.
  7. 10 Best Winter Poems for Poets and Lovers of Poetry. This post includes my top 10 list of winter poems with a little commentary about each poem. Plus, I include a link to each poem for your reading pleasure.
  8. Assembling and Submitting a Poetry Collection. In this post, I draw upon personal experience to share strategies for assembling chapbook and full-length poetry collections. Also, I share how to go about submitting your collection.
  9. Sijo: Poetic Form. Of all the poetic forms I thought might receive the most traffic, I was a little surprised number one was the sijo. But this Korean 3-liner is a lot of fun. So maybe I should've expected it all along.
  10. Types of Poetry Forms: Quatern. Another form, the quatern is a 16-line poem broken into four quatrains. While each line is comprised of 8 syllables, there are no rules governing rhyming or meter.

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Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer’s Digest Writing Community and author of Solving the World’s Problems (Press 53). He loves books. Follow him on Twitter @RobertLeeBrewer.

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