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April PAD Challenge: Day 15

After today's poem, we'll be half-way there. 50% of the way. It's all downhill from here. And other half-way stuff. (For some reason, I've got Bon Jovi's "Living on a Prayer" song running through my head. "Ooooooo, we're half-way there; woooooo-oooo, living on a prayer; take my hand, we'll make it I swear..." Err, or something like that.) ;)

For today's prompt, I want you to take the title of a poem you especially like (by another poet) and change it. Then, with this new altered title, I want you to write a poem. An example would be to take William Carlos Williams' "The Red Wheelbarrow" and change it to "The Red Volkswagon." Or take Frank O'Hara's "Why I Am Not a Painter" and change it to "Why I Am Not a Penguin." You get the idea, right? (Note: Your altered poem does NOT have to follow the same style as the original poet, though you can try if you wish.)

Here's my attempt for the day:

"O Baby! My Baby!"

O Baby! My Baby! You bend me
and shake me like a ragdoll ghost
of a lover you once had. It ain't
bad, but I've noticed a hook or two
stuck in my heart leading to you.

O Baby! My Baby! Our bed must
hate us--the way we get crazy
one minute, then totally lazy. If
we had the time, it'd be working
all day. Even with nothing to say,

O Baby! My Baby! You're the Coca-
Cola of my mornings, the cheesecake
of my evenings. When I'm dreaming,
you're always right by my side, smiling
and happy to be along for the ride.

(Original title "O Captain! My Captain!" by Walt Whitman)

*****

Looking for more poetry information?

  • Check out our poetry titles (on sale in the month of April) HERE.

  • Read the most recent WritersDigest.com poetry-related articles HERE.

  • View several poetic forms HERE.

  • See where poetry is happening HERE.

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