2020 November PAD Chapbook Challenge: Day 28

For the 2020 November PAD Chapbook Challenge, poets write a poem a day in the month of November before assembling a chapbook manuscript in the month of December. Today's prompt is to write a remix poem.
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For today’s prompt, write a remix poem. Take a poem (or poems) you've written and remix it. Turn a free verse poem into a triolet or sonnet. Or rework your villanelle into a prose poem. Have fun with it.

Remember: These prompts are springboards to creativity. Use them to expand your possibilities, not limit them.

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smash poetry journal robert lee brewer

Poem your days away with Robert Lee Brewer's Smash Poetry Journal. This fun poetic guide is loaded with 125 poetry prompts, space to place your poems, and plenty of fun poetic asides.

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Here’s my attempt at a Remix Poem:

“Dream Myself”

We enter the dream
& I wake up on the floor to find
in slow motion
tomatoes aren't red.

Let's untangle the meaning of dreams.
It's easy to know what is real
about the slow motion
covered in sweat from a nightmare.

If it's a dream, then I suppose
I am descended from a long
line of giant fish who said,
"There are no answers you can know."

& then a tapping at the door
& then a bird told a story
(writing by only candle light)
& then the wild animal chases me,

but as I closed the door
I howled & charged forever forward
for the one thing I can't remember
(am I the victim or victimizer?).

I'm pretty sure there's only one way,
but I don't know what I'm doing. 
Why do we have to argue?
It's easy to know what is real.

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(Note: For my remix, I took and reshuffled most of the first lines from my poems this month with a tweak here and there.)

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