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2017 April PAD Challenge: Next Steps

We did it!

Here are some numbers for the 2017 challenge:

  • 30 days
  • 34 prompts (including 4 “Two for Tuesday” prompts)
  • 12,000+ comments (and counting)
  • 1 incredible month!

So, what’s next?

First off, there’s a lot of poetry and poeming that happens around the Poetic Asides blog throughout the year. I’ll share more on that in a moment (see below), but I’m sure at least a few of you are wondering about how the judging will happen, when results will be posted, and so on.

Poets spent all month writing poems, and many of you shared them on the blog. Now that we've made it through the month, I'll start pulling the comments from each day's post and start reading through them.

The poems that speak to me the most from each day will be highlighted in a post later this year; I'm shooting for September 15, 2017. The announcement will be on the Poetic Asides blog.

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Re-create Your Poetry!

Recreating_Poetry_Revise_Poems

Revision doesn’t have to be a chore–something that should be done after the excitement of composing the first draft. Rather, it’s an extension of the creation process!

In the 48-minute tutorial video Re-creating Poetry: How to Revise Poems, poets will be inspired with several ways to re-create their poems with the help of seven revision filters that they can turn to again and again.

Click to continue.

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So that’s it?

Well, no, of course not. There’s a lot of poetry-related mischief happening at Poetic Asides throughout the year, including:

  • Wednesday Poetry Prompts. Yeah, we get together to poem on hump day throughout the year.
  • Poet Interviews. I’ve interviewed more than 100 poets on here over the years. In fact, maybe even more than 200. I don’t keep count, but each and every interview is a snapshot into another poet’s poetic outlook, process, and more.
  • Poetic Forms. Every month or so, I share a new poetic form I’ve found. And that leads to…
  • WD Poetic Form Challenges. These free challenges are devoted to a poetic form, and the winning poem/poet is featured as an example of the form in Writer’s Digest magazine.
  • November PAD (Poem-A-Day) Chapbook Challenge. It’s like April, but it gets even more involved, because the ultimate goal is to produce an amazing chapbook of poems.
  • And more! I don’t know what yet, but I’ve had some great guest post pitches, and I get bored easy–so who knows what tricks I’ve got up my sleeve?!? Seriously, because I don’t.

Still got questions? That’s cool. Drop them in the comments below, or send me an e-mail at robert.brewer@fwcommunity.com.

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Robert Lee Brewer had a lot of fun in April again. He wrote and shared 30 poems on the blog, but he also (as tends to happen) wrote many more poems on the side. Plus, he started a novel for his boys, who asked for it. He hopes you'll continue poeming along on Wednesdays until November, when the November Poem-A-Day Chapbook Challenge begins.

roberttwitterimage

Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer’s Digest Writing Community, which means he gets to do a million things to help writers find more success with their writing (including this blog). He’s also the author of Solving the World’s Problems (Press 53).

Connect with him on Twitter @RobertLeeBrewer.

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