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2013 April PAD Challenge: Day 2

The April PAD (Poem-A-Day) Challenge is designed to help poets do one thing and one thing only: Write more poems! The process of revision may go on for weeks, months, and years later, but this challenge is all about getting that first draft. Please poem along with us--either in the comments below or silently at home.

Today's prompt is a Two-for-Tuesday prompt. For those new to the challenge, you have the option of writing to the first prompt or the second prompt--or even both if you feel so inclined. Here they are:

  • Write a bright poem.
  • Write a dark poem.

Here's my attempt:

"impossible to fold"

boys are so silly
reading minds like directions
instead doing it their own way

girls know
how to tweak
them where it counts

not that they're
ever even aware they're
supposed to do x not y or well

shucks tom
dick and harry
are kind of a punch line

right white
knights don't exist
not even in this dark kingdom

ever afters
slide under the bright
sun measuring men like maps

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Publish Your Poetry!

The 2013 Poet's Market has one purpose: Help poets publish their poems. The 2013 edition includes articles on the craft, business, and promotion of poetry. It offers 20 brand new poems by contemporary poets and hundreds of publishing opportunities with listings for book publishers, magazines and journals, contests and awards, grants, and more! Click to continue.

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Follow me on Twitter @robertleebrewer

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Quick note on commenting: Please always save a copy on your computer. There have been moments in the past in which comments have disappeared, and I don't want anyone to lose their work. Heck, I've lost some of my work here in the past, and it's not a great feeling. That said, commenting here is a lot of fun, especially in April. If you're completely new to the site, you'll be asked to register (don't worry, it's free), and your comments might not appear initially until I manually accept them. However, after that initial phase, your comments should appear without my help.

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