2010 November PAD Chapbook Challenge Rules

Author:
Publish date:

First off, the November PAD Chapbook Challenge is all about the fun and
poeming! During the month of November, don't worry so much about finished
drafts; just get the rough drafts cranked out each day. After all, you've got
December (and the rest of your life, for that matter) to edit.

That said, let's bring on the bulleted list:

  • You do NOT have to register anywhere to participate in the challenge.
    (Though if you want updates from the blog each day, you can sign up for an
    e-mail update or via RSS in the upper left-hand corner over there.)
  • The Challenge will begin at some point on the morning of November 1 (Eastern Time
    U.S.). The time can vary, but don't worry if your day is ending as this blog's
    is beginning, because...
  • The Challenge will continue until noon (Eastern Time U.S.) on December 1.
  • Beginning December 1, all participants will have the month of December to
    revise and organize their November poems into manuscripts of 10-20 pages (no
    more than one poem per page, though it's okay to have one poem that runs for
    multiple pages).
  • By midnight January 5, 2011, poets will need to e-mail their manuscripts
    (saved as either .doc or .txt) to me at robert.brewer@fwmedia.com with the
    subject line: My 2010 November PAD Chapbook MS
  • Poets do not have to post their poems to the blog to participate, BUT it's a
    lot more fun for everyone if you do. (And remember: This is all about fun and
    poeming, yo!)
  • I'll go through the manuscripts with the assistance of my wife, Tammy Foster
    Brewer (who's actually had two chapbooks published now, so she's kinda like an
    expert), and we'll announce a winner on Groundhog Day 2011.

This is the official rules post, so if I've overlooked anything, I'll make updates to this post (and date it at the top of the page). Please spread the word and let the anticipation build.

Can't wait to see
everyone in November!

*****

Follow me on Twitter @robertleebrewer

*****

If you're interested in publishing your poetry, check out the 2011 Poet's Market, edited by moi. It lists hundreds of poetry publishing opportunities for both individual poems and poetry collections (large and small).

Click here to learn more.

Eat Your Words: Your 8-Point Checklist for Writing Original Recipes

Eat Your Words: Your 8-Point Checklist for Writing Original Recipes

Food writer, cook, and committed vegan Peggy Brusseau explains how you can craft a cookbook that engages your reader and stands out from the crowd.

Flash Fiction Challenge

28 Writing Prompts for the 2021 Flash Fiction Challenge Challenge

Find all 28 poetry prompts for the 2021 February Flash Fiction Challenge Challenge in this post.

How to Not Write in the Pandemic, Early Days

How to Not Write in the Pandemic, Early Days

Novelist Rebecca Hardiman gives us an insight into the obstacles that cropped up for writers at the start of the 2020 global pandemic.

7 Tips for Writing Police Procedurals That Readers Love

7 Tips for Writing Police Procedurals That Readers Love

Mystery and crime novelist Russ Thomas explains how best to create a police procedural that will hook your reader and keep them coming back for more.

Poetry Prompt

Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 560

Every Wednesday, Robert Lee Brewer shares a prompt and an example poem to get things started on the Poetic Asides blog. This week, write an alien poem.

3 Tips for Writing with a Co-Author

3 Tips for Writing with a Co-Author

Shakil Ahmad provides the top 3 things he learned while co-authoring the book Wild Sun with his brother Ehsan.

Viet Thanh Nguyen | The Committed | Writer's Digest Quote

WD Interview: Viet Thanh Nguyen on The Committed

Pulitzer Prize-winning author Viet Thanh Nguyen discusses the challenges of writing his second novel, The Committed, and why trusting readers can make for a more compelling narrative in this WD interview.

Dinty W. Moore: Poking Fun at Hell and Dante's Inferno

Dinty W. Moore: Poking Fun at Hell and Dante's Inferno

In this post, Dinty W. Moore shares what inspired his most recent book To Hell With It, what lesson it taught him, why writers should have fun with their writing, and more!