New Literary Agent Alert: Abby Saul of Browne & Miller Literary Associates

Abby’s looking for great and engrossing writing, no matter what the genre. Her top picks from the current wishlist: (1) Complex, literary-leaning psychological thriller/crime. (2) Gothic novel, contemporary or historical. (3) Substantive women’s historical fiction with romantic overtones.
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Reminder: New literary agents (with this spotlight featuring Abby Saul of Browne & Miller Literary Associates) are golden opportunities for new writers because each one is a literary agent who is likely building his or her client list.

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About Abby: Abby joined Browne & Miller Literary Associates in 2013 after spending five years on the production and digital publishing side of the industry, first at John Wiley & Sons and then at Sourcebooks. She is a magna cum laude graduate of Wellesley College. A zealous reader who loves her iPad and recognizes that ebooks are the future, she still can’t resist the lure of a print book. Abby’s personal library of beloved titles runs the gamut from literary newbies and classics, to cozy mysteries, to sappy women’s fiction, to dark and twisted thrillers.

(How to be a literary agent's dream client.)

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She is seeking: Abby’s looking for great and engrossing writing, no matter what the genre. Her top picks from the current Browne & Miller agency wishlist: (1) Complex, literary-leaning psychological thriller/crime novel. We love a dark story really well told—think Tana French or Gillian Flynn (or, for the TV junkies, True Detective, Top of the Lake, or The Fall). (2) Gothic novel, contemporary or historical—anything that takes a cue from Rebecca, Victoria Holt, or The Thirteenth Tale but offers a fresh twist. (3) Substantive women’s historical fiction with romantic overtones—love American, English, and French history, but we are definitely open to other settings and time periods. Check out Abby's Manuscript Wish List.

About Browne & Miller Literary Associates: Founded in 1971 by the late Jane Jordan Browne, Browne & Miller Literary Associates is Chicago's premier literary agency and specializes in full-service representation of a select clientele. Our tastes are varied and eclectic and we value exceptional writing and very fine storytelling above all else. This agency has sold thousands of books over the past 40+ years with a heavy emphasis on commercial fiction. Our roster includes several New York Times bestselling authors and numerous prize- and award-winning writers. Follow us on Twitter: Danielle Egan-Miller, President (@Daninoel25); Joanna MacKenzie, Agent (@joannamackenzie); Abby Saul, Associate Agent (@BookySaul); Agency (@BrowneandMiller)

(Excellent Tips on Writing a Query Letter.)

How to submit: Query Abby at mail [at] browneandmiller.com. Please send only a query letter copied in the body of your email and addressed to Abby. If she is interested in your idea, she will contact you about seeing more material (which will typically include a detailed synopsis plus the first five chapters for fiction and, for non-fiction, a full proposal plus the first three chapters).

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