How These Writers Got Their Agents--And What You Can Learn From Them

Most of us want to know: How do I woo an agent? We've all read the basic advice--make sure you format your query letter right, pick an agent that actually represents the genre you're pitching, send a barbershop quartet to the agent's office to sing Rick Astley's "Never Gonna Give You Up." The best way to learn how to land an agent is to listen to stories from writers who actually got agents. Here are a few good ones.
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Most of us want to know: How do I woo an agent? We've all read the basic advice--make sure you format your query letter right, pick an agent that actually represents the genre you're pitching, send a barbershop quartet to the agent's office to sing Rick Astley's "Never Gonna Give You Up." 1

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The best way to learn how to land an agent is to listen to stories from writers who actually got agents. Chuck Sambuchino, our Guide to Literary Agents editor and all-around ball of agentry knowledge, runs a series called "How I Got My Agent" where writers share their tales of long roads, setbacks, good fortune and, sometimes, luck. I've found most of these not only to be very inspiring but also insightful. After all, any tips that can potentially help you land an agent are worth reading.

Here are a few of my favorites:

How I Got My Agent: David Kazzie


How I Got My Agent: K.M. Ruiz

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How I Got My Agent: David Halperin


For more agent stories, visit the "How I Got My Agent" section of the Guide to Literary Agents blog.

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1This may not net you representation, but it will get you props from your writerly friends for a successful Rickroll.

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