WD Poetic Form Challenge: Paradelle Winner

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It's been so long since we closed out this challenge that some of you may not even remember (or been around to know) we had a paradelle challenge. Well, here are the results, and yes, you can expect a new form challenge just around the corner.

The winning entry is "9 to 5," by Margie Fuston, which uses the repetitive nature of the paradelle to riff on the repetitive nature of work.

9 to 5, by Margie Fuston

Dream. Wake up. Pour cream in patterns in coffee.
Dream. Wake up. Pour cream in patterns in coffee.
Burn your tongue on another sip.
Burn your tongue on another sip.
Wake up in coffee, in cream. Burn another sip.
Pour patterns on your tongue. Dream.

Drive to work two miles over the speed limit.
Drive to work two miles over the speed limit.
Don't notice the poppies on the side of the road.
Don't notice the poppies on the side of the road.
The poppies on the side of the road
don't notice the speed limit. Drive over two miles to work.

Watch the clock on the wall. It ticks a slow minute.
Watch the clock on the wall. It ticks a slow minute.
Avoid the smiling woman in a blue dress with buttons.
Avoid the smiling woman in a blue dress with buttons.
Watch the wall, the clock; the woman in a dress with buttons.
A slow, blue minute ticks on, smiling. Avoid it

with patterns on the cream wall. Work
two miles over the speed limit. Pour a minute
in coffee. Watch it. Avoid another sip.
Dream in blue buttons on a dress. Drive into
the slow poppies on the side of the road, the woman.
Notice your tongue ticks, smiling. Burn the clock. Don't wake up.

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Re-create Your Poetry!

Recreating_Poetry_Revise_Poems

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In the 48-minute tutorial video Re-creating Poetry: How to Revise Poems, poets will be inspired with several ways to re-create their poems with the help of seven revision filters that they can turn to again and again.

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Congratulations, Margie!

Here's the complete Top 10 list:

  1. "9 to 5," by Margie Fuston
  2. "Flesh," by Tracy Davidson
  3. "Whisper to the Night," by Daniel Roessler
  4. "Organic Humor," by RJ Clarken
  5. "Night Flight," by William Preston
  6. "The Fire in the Sky," by Michelle Hed
  7. "Live Long," by Walt Wojtanik
  8. "A Paradelle of Creation," by Alice Stainer
  9. "Inside Out," by Charise M. Hoge
  10. "First Heartbreak," by Amaria

Congratulations to everyone in the Top 10! And to everyone who tried their hand at Billy Collins' paradelle!

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Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer’s Digest Writing Community and author of the poetry collection, Solving the World’s Problems. In addition to managing this blog, he edits Writer’s Market and Poet’s Market, writes a poetry column for Writer’s Digest magazine, leads online education, speaks at events around the country, and lots of other fun writing-related stuff.

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He’s married to the poet Tammy Foster Brewer, who helps him keep track of their five little poets.

Follow him on Twitter @robertleebrewer.

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