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WD Poetic Form Challenge: Kimo

The WD Poetic Form Challenge is your opportunity to write and share a poem (the kimo this time around) for a chance to get published in the Poetic Asides column in Writer's Digest. Deadline: May 15, 2022.

I'm hoping to announce the winner of the chanso WD Poetic Form Challenge within the next week, but let's go ahead and start another new poetic form challenge. This time around, we'll write the kimo, an Israeli three-liner. Find the rules for writing the kimo here.

So start writing them and sharing here (on this specific post) for a chance to be published in Writer's Digest magazine–as part of the Poetic Asides column.

Note on commenting: On this new site, you have to set up a free Disqus account and then scroll to the bottom of this page (or any page on the site) to register with the WritersDigest.com site (also free). Then, you can start commenting away!

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The Complete Guide of Poetic Forms

Play with poetic forms!

Poetic forms are fun poetic games, and this digital guide collects more than 100 poetic forms, including more established poetic forms (like sestinas and sonnets) and newer invented forms (like golden shovels and fibs).

Click to continue.

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Here's how the challenge works:

  • Challenge is free. No entry fee.
  • The winner (and sometimes a runner-up or two) will be featured in a future edition of Writer’s Digest magazine as part of the Poetic Asides column.
  • Deadline 11:59 p.m. (Atlanta, GA time) on May 15, 2022.
  • Poets can enter as many kimo attempts as they wish. The more "work" you make for me the better, but remember: I'm judging on quality, not quantity.
  • All poems should be previously unpublished. If you have a specific question about your specific situation, just send me an email at rbrewer@aimmedia.com. Or just write a new kimo. They're fun to write; I promise.
  • I will only consider the kimo poems shared in the comments below or via email with the subject line: WD Poetic Form Entry: Kimo. It gets too confusing for me to check other posts, go to other blogs, etc.
  • Speaking of posting, set up a free Disqus account at disqus.com to comment on this post at the bottom of the page.
  • Please include your name as you would like it to appear in print. If you don't, I'll be forced to use your user/screen name, which might be something like HaikuPrincess007 or MrLineBreaker. WD has a healthy circulation, so make it easy for me to get your byline correct.
  • Finally–and most importantly–be sure to have fun!
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