2020 November PAD Chapbook Challenge: Day 4

For the 2020 November PAD Chapbook Challenge, poets are tasked with writing a poem a day in the month of November before assembling a chapbook manuscript in the month of December. Today's prompt is to write a blank myself poem.
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For today’s prompt, take the phrase "(blank) Myself," replace the blank with a word or phrase, make the new phrase the title of your poem, and then, write your poem. Possible titles could include: "Love Myself," "All By Myself," "Checking on Myself," and/or even "Blank Myself."

Remember: These prompts are springboards to creativity. Use them to expand your possibilities, not limit them.

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Poem your days away with Robert Lee Brewer's Smash Poetry Journal. This fun poetic guide is loaded with 125 poetry prompts, space to place your poems, and plenty of fun poetic asides.

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Here’s my attempt at a Blank Myself Poem:

“Scare Myself”

Covered in sweat from a nightmare,
I discover the power's out
without a warning to prepare.
Covered in sweat from a nightmare,
I jump at nothing's that aren't there
and fumble with my mounting doubt.
Covered in sweat from a nightmare,
I discover the power's out.

(Note: Today's example poem is a triolet. Learn 100 poetic forms here.)

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