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2019 November PAD Chapbook Challenge: Day 12

For the 2019 November PAD Chapbook Challenge, poets are tasked with writing a poem a day in the month of November before assembling a chapbook manuscript in the month of December. Today's Two-for-Tuesday prompt is to write a Form and/or Anti-Form Poem.

For the 2019 November PAD Chapbook Challenge, poets are tasked with writing a poem a day in the month of November before assembling a chapbook manuscript in the month of December. Today's Two-for-Tuesday prompt is to write a Form and/or Anti-Form Poem.

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Today is our second Two-for-Tuesday prompt day. Pick one prompt for your poem today, or write a poem for each prompt, or write one poem that works with both. Today's prompts are:

  1. Write a form poem (here's a list of 100 poetic forms for reference), and/or...
  2. Write an anti-form poem.

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Recreate Your Poetry!

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Revision doesn’t have to be a chore—something that has to be done after the joy of the first draft. In fact, revision should be viewed as an enjoyable extension of the creation process—something that you want to experience after the joy of the first draft.

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Here’s my attempt at a Form and/or Anti-Form Poem:

“Teenage Dream”

My words spring
forth without a plan
but I don't
worry or
trouble the local starman
who watches over

everyone
with curious thrill
wondering
and waiting
with so much time to kill in
crimson and clover.

[Note on the form: For today's poem, I wrote a two-stanza shadorma.]

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