2018 November PAD Chapbook Challenge: Day 2

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Whew! Made it through the first day. Onward!

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For today’s prompt, write a darkest hour poem. Some people may think of midnight or the witching hour. Still others may picture those moments right before the sun starts gradually lighting up the sky. But the darkest hour could also be a moment in time that is psychological, metaphorical, or some-other-kind-of-cal. And remember the poem doesn't have to be directly about your idea of the darkest hour; it could be set in it or refer to it.

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Master Poetic Forms!

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Learn how to write sestina, shadorma, haiku, monotetra, golden shovel, and more with The Writer’s Digest Guide to Poetic Forms, by Robert Lee Brewer.

This e-book covers more than 40 poetic forms and shares examples to illustrate how each form works.

Discover a new universe of poetic possibilities and apply it to your poetry today!

Click to continue.

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Here’s my attempt at a Darkest Hour Poem:

“the music done died”

the music done died
& the people done cried

the world kept spinning
but no one was winning

all felt covered in night
without any moonlight

just a wind that blew cold
through stories been told

the music done died
& the people done cried

without a thing to say
or new note to play

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Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer’s Digest Writing Community and author of the poetry collection, Solving the World’s Problems (Press 53). He edits Poet’s Market and Writer’s Market, in addition to writing a free weekly WritersMarket.com newsletter and a poetry column for Writer’s Digest magazine.

This is his eleventh year of hosting and participating in the November PAD (Poem-A-Day) Chapbook Challenge. He can’t wait to see what everyone creates this month–not only on a day-by-day basis, but when the chapbooks start arriving in December and January. Fun, fun, fun.

And if you don't know what he's talking about, click here for the November PAD Chapbook Challenge guidelines.

Follow him on Twitter @robertleebrewer.