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2016 November PAD Chapbook Challenge: Day 13

For today’s prompt, write a poem about something that happens regularly. Could be something that happens daily, weekly, monthly, every full moon. Whatever the rotation, it happens--like writing poems each day of November.

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Order the New Poet’s Market!

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The 2017 Poet’s Market, edited by Robert Lee Brewer, includes hundreds of poetry markets, including listings for poetry publications, publishers, contests, and more! With names, contact information, and submission tips, poets can find the right markets for their poetry and achieve more publication success than ever before.

Order your copy today!

In addition to the listings, there are articles on the craft, business, and promotion of poetry–so that poets can learn the ins and outs of writing poetry and seeking publication. Plus, it includes a one-year subscription to the poetry-related information on WritersMarket.com. All in all, it’s the best resource for poets looking to secure publication.

Click to continue.

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Here’s my attempt at a Regular Occurrence poem:

“Brushing My Teeth”

I believe I'm supposed to recite the alphabet
in my head as I brush, but I usually think about
the day ahead or the one that just concluded

instead or the amount of toothpaste still left
in the tube that disappears little by little each
day like the remaining moments of my life,

which could make me melancholy, I suppose,
but those quiet moments alone brushing and
thinking and planning and doubting are

the moments I feel the most human and
they are the moments I feel the most alive
and I wouldn't trade them for anything.

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Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer’s Digest Writing Community and author of the poetry collection, Solving the World’s Problems (Press 53). He edits Poet’s Market and Writer’s Market, in addition to writing a free weekly WritersMarket.com newsletter and a poetry column for Writer’s Digest magazine.

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He does think a little too much when he brushes his teeth. Also, fun fact: He uses a child-sized toothbrush.

Follow him on Twitter @robertleebrewer.

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