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2016 April PAD Challenge: Day 21

Today is Poem in Your Pocket Day! It's a day to pick a poem to carry in your pocket and share spontaneously throughout your day. Click here to learn more.

For today's prompt, write a poem that responds (or somehow communicates) with another poem. You can respond to any poem. If you're having trouble figuring out which one, choose a poem from this following list of poems from collections I've been reading this month:

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Poet's Market 2016

Poet's Market 2016

Publish Your Poetry!

The 2016 Poet’s Market, edited by Robert Lee Brewer, includes hundreds of poetry markets, including listings for poetry publications, publishers, contests, and more! With names, contact information, and submission tips, poets can find the right markets for their poetry and achieve more publication success than ever before.

In addition to the listings, there are articles on the craft, business, and promotion of poetry–so that poets can learn the ins and outs of writing poetry and seeking publication. Plus, it includes a one-year subscription to the poetry-related information on WritersMarket.com. All in all, it’s the best resource for poets looking to secure publication.

Click to continue.

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Here’s my attempt at a Response Poem:

“nothing is explained”

-after Ross Gay

music decorates this siesta

with a sort of precious
scent of delirium
some daydream sestina
digging a small
grave with a shovel

the golden instrument of
isolating pi
as math of the non-
linear anima
ascent before the fall

to her animus'
unanimous no
feasting upon
my open catalog

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Robert Lee Brewer has been trying to put the final touches on his second poetry collection, so of course, he’s been writing several poems for the third collection (because he knows how to procrastinate in a productive manner). Anyway, it’s been an exciting April so far.

roberttwitterimage

Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer’s Digest Writing Community, which means he gets to do a million things to help writers find more success with their writing (including this blog). He’s also the author of Solving the World’s Problems (Press 53).

Connect with him on Twitter @RobertLeeBrewer.

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