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2016 April PAD Challenge: Day 2

The 2016 April PAD Challenge shuffles along to Day 2. Let's unwrap today's prompt.

For today's prompt, write a what he said and/or what she said poem. Maybe he or she said a rumor; maybe he or she gave directions; or maybe he or she said something that made absolutely no sense at all. I don't know what they said; rather, each poet is tasked with revealing that knowledge.

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Poet's Market 2016

Poet's Market 2016

Publish Your Poetry!

The 2016 Poet’s Market, edited by Robert Lee Brewer, includes hundreds of poetry markets, including listings for poetry publications, publishers, contests, and more! With names, contact information, and submission tips, poets can find the right markets for their poetry and achieve more publication success than ever before.

In addition to the listings, there are articles on the craft, business, and promotion of poetry–so that poets can learn the ins and outs of writing poetry and seeking publication. Plus, it includes a one-year subscription to the poetry-related information on WritersMarket.com. All in all, it’s the best resource for poets looking to secure publication.

Click to continue.

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Here's my attempt at a What He Said or She Said Poem:

"Things We Say"

What he said really isn't that important,
but the way he said it. At least, that's what
she said, and the way she said it really

made me think she meant it, though I couldn't help
playing devil's advocate. That is, I
could not help wondering: How important

are words when people are going to take
them or leave them wherever they desire?
Does language break down barriers, or does

it give people new ways to hide meaning?

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Robert Lee Brewer remembers his first April PAD (Poem-A-Day) Challenge. He spent part of it in Tennessee with his future wife, and he even spent money to "rent" online access so he could post poems from downtown Gatlinburg.

roberttwitterimage

Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer's Digest Writing Community, which means he gets to do a million things to help writers find more success with their writing (including this blog). He's also the author of Solving the World's Problems (Press 53).

Connect with him on Twitter @RobertLeeBrewer.

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