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2016 April PAD Challenge: Day 10

Wow! Day 10 already! I don't know how to feel about being one-third of the way through this challenge already. If only there were a prompt for getting to the bottom of that...

For today’s prompt, pick an emotion, make it the title of your poem, and then, write your poem. Possible titles might include: "Happy," "Sad," "Angry," or well, there's a universe of emotions out there. Here's a list of some possibilities.

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Poet's Market 2016

Poet's Market 2016

Publish Your Poetry!

The 2016 Poet’s Market, edited by Robert Lee Brewer, includes hundreds of poetry markets, including listings for poetry publications, publishers, contests, and more! With names, contact information, and submission tips, poets can find the right markets for their poetry and achieve more publication success than ever before.

In addition to the listings, there are articles on the craft, business, and promotion of poetry–so that poets can learn the ins and outs of writing poetry and seeking publication. Plus, it includes a one-year subscription to the poetry-related information on WritersMarket.com. All in all, it’s the best resource for poets looking to secure publication.

Click to continue.

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Here’s my attempt at an Emotion Poem:

“Empty”

There's a world of difference
between the empty I feel
at the end of a long run and
how I feel when you leave.

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Robert Lee Brewer has felt about every emotion there is over the course of his life. He is a sort of emotion expert, not in the sense of understanding how they work, mind you, but in terms of knowing how emotions work on him, which they're constantly doing.

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Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer’s Digest Writing Community, which means he gets to do a million things to help writers find more success with their writing (including this blog). He’s also the author of Solving the World’s Problems (Press 53).

Connect with him on Twitter @RobertLeeBrewer.

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Find more poetic posts here:

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