2015 November PAD Chapbook Challenge: Day 2

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Great start to the November Poem-A-Day Chapbook Challenge yesterday. If you missed the prompt, you can get it here. Themes are not a requirement for this challenge, but they can make it fun. Sometimes, I come in with one in mind; other times, it just kind of evolves. This year's is starting to evolve, and I hope it continues throughout the month. Happy poeming!

For today’s prompt, write a surrender poem. A person can surrender to the authorities or a mob, but people can also surrender to a feeling or to music. Or leftover Halloween candy (at least, "my friend" has had that problem). I hope you surrender to your poetic impulse.

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Re-create Your Poetry!

Recreating_Poetry_Revise_Poems

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In the 48-minute tutorial video Re-creating Poetry: How to Revise Poems, poets will be inspired with several ways to re-create their poems with the help of seven revision filters that they can turn to again and again.

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Here’s my attempt at a Surrender poem:

“Suspect”

Before midnight, the news broke that Hank McGee
was wanted in connection with the missing teen.

Just after midnight, McGee surrendered himself
without any fuss, though he didn't understand why

they singled him out. Of course, it was pretty obvious
after the press conference with the chief:

McGee was the local pot hook up that Wilcox used,
and it was known by more than a few that he'd

run up a bit of a debt as well--to the point that McGee
told associates he wanted to even up by taking

his wheels or his girl. Or both. Beyond that,
Crazy Joe saw them racing on Witch's Bend

the night Wilcox went missing. "We have a motive,"
said the chief. "Now, we just need the guy and his car."

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Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer’s Digest Writing Community and author of the poetry collection, Solving the World’s Problems (Press 53). He edits Poet’s Market and Writer’s Market, in addition to writing a free weekly WritersMarket.com newsletter and a poetry column for Writer’s Digest magazine.

roberttwitterimage

This is his eighth year of hosting and participating in the November PAD (Poem-A-Day) Chapbook Challenge. He can’t wait to see what everyone creates this month–not only on a day-by-day basis, but when the chapbooks start arriving in December and January. Fun, fun, fun.

Follow him on Twitter @robertleebrewer.

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