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2015 November PAD Chapbook Challenge: Day 15

After finishing today's poem, we'll be half-way through the month. Let's do it!

For today's prompt, write a ritual poem. Getting up to write a poem each day is a sort of ritual, but most folks have so many others. For instance, a morning ritual of getting ready, an evening ritual of getting to sleep, and maybe even a daily ritual of interacting with the world. Write about your own rituals or the rituals of others.

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Re-create Your Poetry!

Recreating_Poetry_Revise_Poems

Revision doesn’t have to be a chore–something that should be done after the excitement of composing the first draft. Rather, it’s an extension of the creation process!

In the 48-minute tutorial video Re-creating Poetry: How to Revise Poems, poets will be inspired with several ways to re-create their poems with the help of seven revision filters that they can turn to again and again.

Click to continue.

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Here’s my attempt at a Ritual poem:

“Mornings With Clara Moss”

When she wakes up, she checks her phone for any new news
about someone. Then, she closes her eyes and stifles back
the tears she wants to cry. She's alone without her someone
any more. Every morning now, she can't help but think about
what happened to her guy, the one with the hypnotic eyes.
She brushes her teeth and brushes her hair, but she feels
as if she is not there, because he's not there. He won't be there

driving his car, like he used to do, to pick her up on their way
to school. He would play his music real loud, and she was
proud to be his girl with the windows up and her hair in
the wind as they flew around the Witch's Bend and the Carter
house, no one telling them what they should do or never
should do. She's losing her mind and her soul somehow,
and she's really crying now. O, where could Jesse be?

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Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer’s Digest Writing Community and author of the poetry collection, Solving the World’s Problems (Press 53). He edits Poet’s Market and Writer’s Market, in addition to writing a free weekly WritersMarket.com newsletter and a poetry column for Writer’s Digest magazine.

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This is his eighth year of hosting and participating in the November PAD (Poem-A-Day) Chapbook Challenge. He can’t wait to see what everyone creates this month–not only on a day-by-day basis, but when the chapbooks start arriving in December and January. Fun, fun, fun.

Follow him on Twitter @robertleebrewer.

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Poetry Prompt

Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 620

Every Wednesday, Robert Lee Brewer shares a prompt and an example poem to get things started on the Poetic Asides blog. This week, write a "Noun of Place" poem.