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2013 November PAD Chapbook Challenge: Day 25

I have a confession to make: I'm in Ohio right now with limited access to the Internet. As such, I'm not able to share each day's prompt on social media sites like I usually do. Soooo... I'm asking a favor: Could you share today's prompt (and the rest of the prompts this month) on your social media profiles (if you have one)? It would really help keep others engaged and motivated. Thanks in advance!

For today's prompt, take a poem from earlier in the challenge (that you've written) and remix it. You could take a free verse poem and re-work it into a villanelle or shadorma. You could re-work multiple poems into a new one. You could take a line from one of the poems and write a response poem to it. Or you can take it in an entirely different direction.

Also, before I get to my example, I'd like to share that I'm currently running a remix challenge for poems in my debut collection, Solving the World's Problems (click here to read about the challenge). It's free to enter, and the winner will receive a $500 prize. Be sure to check it out.

Here's my attempt at a Remix Poem:

"Anywhere"

I left just before they started
running. I watched them watch. Sometimes
intent trumps technology. He

beat a woman with a hammer.
Take it like a man. I've felt death
at my elbow. I remember

your hands, your words. Every time,
a gun is fired. In every
large city and small town, there is

so much beauty it hurts to look
too close. Children play, their parents
talk, and databases collect

us all. You didn't know me, but
I heard shots and wondered before
leaving, and I'll never return.

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Learn the Fundamentals of Poetry.Click to learn more.

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Robert Lee Brewer

Robert Lee Brewer

Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer's Digest Writing Community and took the remix approach of lifting lines from multiple poems he wrote during the first 24 days of the challenge. Not every poem had something to offer, but it was a fun exercise. Robert is the author of Solving the World's Problems and married to the poet Tammy Foster Brewer, who helped show him new ways to attack the process of revision. He can be followed on Twitter @robertleebrewer.

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