Skip to main content

2012 November PAD Chapbook Challenge: Guidelines

I've been putting off announcing the upcoming poem-a-day chapbook challenge until I can announce the results of the April challenge, but it's looking like that will be pushing up against the end of the month. What can I say? I've just been blessed with an abundance of things to do.

Anyway, I'm so excited that we'll be jumping into a new poem-a-day challenge. This post is intended to give people an idea of what to expect from the challenge.

Here are the basics of the challenge:

  • Beginning on November 1 (Atlanta, Georgia time), I will share a prompt and poem each day of November on this blog.
  • Poets are then challenged to write a poem each day (no matter where you live on the planet) within 24 hours (or so) from when the prompt is posted.
  • Poets do NOT have to register anywhere to participate. In fact, poets don't even need to post to this blog to be considered participants.
  • The Challenge will unofficially conclude around 24 hours after the final prompt is posted. That said...
  • This Challenge is unique, because I expect poets to take all the material they've written in November and create a chapbook manuscript during the month of December. (Yes, you can revise material, and yes, the chapbook should be composed mostly of poems written for the challenge--I'm using the honor system.)
  • Poets have until 11:59 p.m. (Atlanta, GA time) on January 7, 2013, to submit a manuscript that can be 10-20 pages in length (not including table of contents, title page, etc.) with no more than one poem per page. So if you wrote 50 poems in November, you have to narrow them down to the best 20 (or even fewer). Submit manuscripts to robert.brewer@fwmedia.com with the subject line: 2012 November PAD Chapbook Challenge. (The subject line is very important.)
  • The goal will be to announce a winning manuscript by Groundhog Day 2013.

What do poets get out of this challenge? If nothing else, they get several new poems, but I've heard plenty of success stories over the years from poets who have gone on to publish individual poems from these challenges and even complete collections (mostly inspired by the challenges).

Plus, the winner gets recognized on this blog, along with many honorable mentions. That's a good thing.

But the best part, I think, is that poets who share their poems in the comments of each post create a community that lives beyond the actual challenge. That's incredibly important for the lonely poet.

Speaking of comments, I've been made aware of problems with commenting on the Poetic Asides blog by some poets. Technological hiccups like these are the reason why I don't make it mandatory for poets to post on the blog to participate. However, I believe one common reason behind this problem is when people spend a long time typing their comment. Sooo... I'd recommend typing your poem in Word (or something similar) before pasting your poem in the comments. Hopefully, this will help.

If you have any additional questions, shoot them to me in the comments.

I can't wait to see everyone in November.

******

Follow me on Twitter @robertleebrewer

*****

Interested in publishing your poetry?

Excellent! I have just the book to help you do that. In fact, I'm the editor of the 2013 Poet's Market, which helps beginning and experienced poets get published and find an audience for their poetry. It does this by listing hundreds of publishing opportunities specifically for poets in poetry publications, publishers, contests, and more. Plus, there are several articles on the craft and business of poetry.

Start getting your poetry published today!

Chanel Cleeton: On Reader Enthusiasm Conjuring Novel Ideas

Chanel Cleeton: On Reader Enthusiasm Conjuring Novel Ideas

Author Chanel Cleeton discusses how reader curiosity led her to write her new historical fiction novel, Our Last Days in Barcelona.

Writer's Digest Interview | Marlon James Quote

The Writer's Digest Interview: Marlon James

Booker Prize–winning author Marlon James talks about mythology and world-building in his character-driven epic Moon Witch, Spider King, the second book in his Dark Star Trilogy in this interview from the March/April 2022 issue of Writer's Digest.

writer's digest wd presents

WD Presents: New Podcast Episode, a Chance at Publication, and More!

This week, we're excited to announce our newest podcast episode, your chance to be published, and more!

David Adams Cleveland: On Truth Revealing Itself in Historical Fiction

David Adams Cleveland: On Truth Revealing Itself in Historical Fiction

Award-winning novelist David Adams Cleveland discusses the timeliness of his new novel, Gods of Deception.

Lisa Jewell | Writer's Digest Interview Quote

The WD Interview: Lisa Jewell

The New York Times-bestselling British author discusses creating thrilling plot twists and developing characters in her 19th novel, The Night She Disappeared, in this interview from the Jan/Feb 2022 issue of Writer's Digest.

5 Tips for Successfully Pitching Literary Agents in Person (That Worked for Me at the Writer’s Digest Annual Conference)

5 Tips for Successfully Pitching Literary Agents in Person (That Worked for Me at the Writer’s Digest Annual Conference)

Author Anat Deracine found her agent at Writer’s Digest Annual Conference. Now she’s sharing what she’s learned to help other writers become authors. Here are her 5 tips for successfully pitching literary agents in person.

Tips for Reading Poetry in Front of an Audience

8 Tips for Reading Your Poetry in Front of an Audience

Poet's Market editor and published poet Robert Lee Brewer shares eight tips for reading your poetry in front of an audience.

Plot Twist Story Prompts: Strength Lost

Plot Twist Story Prompts: Strength Lost

Every good story needs a nice (or not so nice) turn or two to keep it interesting. This week, let a character lose their powers.

Sharon Short | Point of View Quote 1

Managing Point of View: Mythbusting

In the first of this three-part series, novelist and WD columnist Sharon Short breaks down 7 of the most common myths about choosing which POV is right for your story.