Weekly Round-Up: Writing Challenges

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Every week our editors publish around 10 blog posts—but it can be hard to keep up amidst the busyness of everyday life. To make sure you never miss another post, we've created a new weekly round-up series. Each Saturday, find the previous week's posts all in one place.

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Prove Yourself

Test your literary knowledge with Quotation Quibbles: Which Literary Villain Uttered Each of the Following Quotes?

Do you have what it takes to beat procrastination, that great enemy of writers everywhere? Yes, you do. Read Conquer Procrastination: How to Appreciate Your Writing Time to find out how.

Combining humor and horror might seem impossible, but you can do it! Check out 3 Tips for Writing Horror Comedy.

November's End

NaNoWriMo 2017 is over—we made it! To celebrate with your fellow NaNo writers, here are 10 Great Lines from 2017 NaNoWriMo Novels.

At the end of every November comes one special day, a great yearly tradition—Giving Tuesday. In honor of Giving Tuesday (or for any day you want to donate!), here are 14 Charities for Writing & Literacy.

2017 November PAD Chapbook Challenge

Catch up on all of the prompts from this past week.

  • Day 25: Write a remix poem.
  • Day 26: Write a shine poem.
  • Day 27: Write a poem with the title "(blank) of (blank)," replacing each blank with a word or phrase of your choice.
  • Day 28: Write a love poem, or write an anti-love poem.
  • Day 29: Write a response poem.
  • Day 30: Write a "back in the day" poem.

November is over, which means you're done with the November PAD Chapbook Challenge! What now? Check out 2017 November PAD Chapbook Challenge: Next Steps.

Agents and Opportunities

This week's new literary agent alert is for Cynthia Ruchti of Books & Such Management. She is seeking Christian fiction, Christian nonfiction, devotionals, Bible studies, and a few projects for children.

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The Writer, The Inner Critic, & The Slacker

Author and writing professor Alexander Weinstein explains the three parts of a writer's psyche, how they can work against the writer, and how to utilize them for success.

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Todd Stottlemyre: On Mixing and Bending Genres

Author Todd Stottlemyre explains how he combined fiction and nonfiction in his latest book and what it meant as a writer to share his personal experiences.

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Plot Twist Story Prompts: Take a Trip

Every good story needs a nice (or not so nice) turn or two to keep it interesting. This week, have a character take a trip somewhere.

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Making the Switch from Romance to Women’s Fiction

In this article, author Jennifer Probst explains the differences between romance and women's fiction, the importance of both, and how you can make the genre switch.

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Stephanie Wrobel: On Writing an Unusual Hero

Author Stephanie Wrobel explains how she came to write about mental illness and how it affects familial relationships, as well as getting inside the head of an unusual character.

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Who Are the Inaugural Poets for United States Presidents?

Here is a list of the inaugural poets for United States Presidential Inauguration Days from Robert Frost to Amanda Gorman. This post also touches on who an inaugural poet is and which presidents have had them at their inaugurations.

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Precedent vs. President (Grammar Rules)

Learn when to use precedent vs. president with Grammar Rules from the Writer's Digest editors, including a few examples of correct usages.

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Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 554

Every Wednesday, Robert Lee Brewer shares a prompt and an example poem to get things started on the Poetic Asides blog. This week, write a future poem.

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New Agent Alert: Tasneem Motala of The Rights Factory

New literary agent alerts (with this spotlight featuring Tasneem Motala of The Rights Factory) are golden opportunities for new writers because each one is a literary agent who is likely building his or her client list.