New Literary Agent Alert: Cecilia Lyra of The Rights Factory

New literary agent alerts (with this spotlight featuring Cecilia Lyra of The Rights Factory) are golden opportunities for new writers because each one is a literary agent who is likely building his or her client list.
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New literary agent alerts (with this spotlight featuring Cecilia Lyra of The Rights Factory) are golden opportunities for new writers because each one is a literary agent who is likely building his or her client list.

About Cecilia:

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Cecilia Lyra holds a Master’s Degree in Banking and Financial Law from Boston University and is completing a graduate certificate in publishing. In 2016, she bid adieu to her life as lawyer and professor of law to become a writer and a literary agent. She blames this heretical career move on her nine-year-old-self, who was bitten by the reading bug and began to dream of the day when she would work with books. When she isn’t devouring novels—or dessert—Cecilia can be found drinking wine, writing her own novels, and snuggling with Babaganoush, her adorable English bulldog. Follow her on Twitter @ceciliaclyra

What she's seeking:

Cecilia is actively seeking literary and commercial adult fiction that feature diverse, layered characters and unexpected plot twists. As a feminist, Cecilia loathes the term women's fiction — it's just fiction — but, for the purposes of clarity, that is her favorite genre. Cecilia is also looking for unique and compelling narrative nonfiction and memoirs (think: nonfiction that would be perfect for book clubs). She is particularly passionate about representing under- or misrepresented voices and stories that contribute to a larger cultural conversation. Do not send a manuscript where the dog dies — Cecilia can't handle it.

How to submit:

Submissions can be emailed to cecilia@therightsfactory.com

Please include (in the body of the email):

  • a pitch;
  • a bio (including a summary of your writing credentials and platform, if applicable); and
  • the first ten pages of your work.

Preferred format: Times, 12-size font, justified paragraphs, 1.5 spacing. Attachments will not be opened.

Because Cecilia understands writers' anxiety, she will respond to each and every query within 6 weeks. For more information, please visit www.therightsfactory.com

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