New Literary Agent Alert: Rachael Dugas of Talcott Notch Literary

Reminder: Newer agents are golden opportunities for new writers because they’re likely building their client list; however, always make sure your work is as perfect as it can be before submitting, and only query agencies that are a great fit for your work. Otherwise, you’re just wasting time and postage. She is seeking: Rachael represents cookbooks and young adult, middle grade, and adult fiction in the contemporary, paranormal, women's, and romance genres. She would love to receive more cookbooks (especially with a unique perspective, distinct voice and sense of place, and stellar marketing platform), beautifully written historical and/or literary fiction, really terrific memoir, and fun, contemporary YA or adult fiction, especially pertaining to food or the performing arts.
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Reminder: New literary agents (with this spotlight featuring Rachael Dugas of Talcott Notch Literary) are golden opportunities for new writers because each one is a literary agent who is likely building his or her client list.

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About Rachael: Rachael Dugas (@RachaelDugas on Twitter) joined Talcott Notch Literary as an associate agent in June 2011. She earned her BA in English from Ithaca College in 2010 and worked as an intern at Sourcebooks and at online food magazine www.poortastemag.com before assuming her current position.

(Should You Sign With a New Literary Agent? Know the Pros and Cons.)

She is seeking: Rachael represents cookbooks and young adult, middle grade, and adult fiction in the contemporary, paranormal, women's, and romance genres. She would love to receive more cookbooks (especially with a unique perspective, distinct voice and sense of place, and stellar marketing platform), beautifully written historical and/or literary fiction, really terrific memoir, and fun, contemporary YA or adult fiction, especially pertaining to food or the performing arts.

(What does that one word mean? Read definitions of unique & unusual literary words.)

How to contact: The best way to reach Rachael is via editorial (at) talcottnotch.net, with ATTN: Rachael Dugas somewhere in the subject line (and we ask you do include your first 10 pages in the body of the email). Please visit www.talcottnotch.net for additional information regarding submissions.

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