New Agent Alert: Pam Gruber of Irene Goodman Literary Agency

New literary agent alerts (with this spotlight featuring Pam Gruber of Irene Goodman Literary Agency) are golden opportunities for new writers because each one is a literary agent who is likely building his or her client list.
Author:
Publish date:
Pam Gruber_photo 2(1)

About Pam:

Pam Gruber began her career in publishing as an editor, working for over 10 years at Hachette Book Group with a number of acclaimed authors and illustrators. From there, she went on to serve as the editorial director at the children’s media startup Rebel Girls, where she saw firsthand how a great book can expand into other entertainment mediums.

Pam joined Irene Goodman as a literary agent after realizing her favorite part of the publishing business was working directly with authors and artists, helping them to shape not only their stories, but also their careers.

She looks for work that is gripping from page one, whether it makes her break out in a smile or gives her goosebumps (from excitement, not fear!). She loves complicated female protagonists, innovative twists on classic tropes, and getting swept away by fully realized worlds—be it the next town over or an imagined universe unlike our own.

Originally from Philadelphia, Pam knew she wanted to work in publishing from a young age. She brings an inscrutable eye for detail to every book she gets her hands on, and her experience at a publishing house gives her insight into how editors think and what they’re looking for.

Currently seeking:

Pam is looking for adult, young adult, and middle grade fiction with literary voices and commercial hooks. She is particularly interested in layered fantasy, speculative fiction, fantastical realism, rom-coms, and coming-of-age stories with a twist. She is also open to realistic middle grade and YA graphic novels, as well as select narrative nonfiction on lesser-known subjects. Pam would not be the best fit for prescriptive nonfiction, anthologies, potty humor, paranormal, or erotica.

How to submit:

Please send your query letter to pam.queries@irenegoodman.com along with the first 10 pages of your manuscript, a brief synopsis, and your bio in the body of the email.

The Transformative Power of a Post-First-Draft Outline

The Transformative Power of a Post-First-Draft Outline

Have you ever considered outlining after finishing your first draft? Kris Spisak walks you through the process.

Poetic Forms

The Skinny: Poetic Forms

Poetic Form Fridays are made to share various poetic forms. This week, we look at the skinny, a form created by Truth Thomas.

The Benefits of Writing Book Reviews

The Benefits of Writing Book Reviews

A book review is more than sharing an opinion—it's a conversation between readers. Sam Risak shares the benefits of writing books reviews, as well as best practices for getting started.

Plot Twist Story Prompts: Give In

Plot Twist Story Prompts: Give In

Every good story needs a nice (or not so nice) turn or two to keep it interesting. This week, have a character give in to something or someone.

Essential Versus Non-Essential Mystery

Essential Versus Non-Essential Mystery

What gets a reader to keep turning pages? Author Amanda Kabak seeks to answer that question here.

5-Minute Memoir: Anonymous Fame

5-Minute Memoir: Anonymous Fame

5-Minute Memoir is exactly what it sounds like—a personal essay on some facet of the writing life, be it a narrative or a reflection, pensive, touching or hilarious. Enjoy this installment from Barbara Neal Varma.

My Writer Success Story Began With Getting Over Myself

My Writer Success Story Began With Getting Over Myself

Debut author Christina Wyman discusses how getting out of her own way led to her authorial success.

Poetry Prompt

Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 574

Every Wednesday, Robert Lee Brewer shares a prompt and an example poem to get things started on the Poetic Asides blog. This week, write a missing poem.

How to Write a Nonfiction Book Outline

How to Write a Nonfiction Book Outline

You have an idea for a nonfiction book. Now what? Author Rick Lauber shares how outlining before writing can help you decide what to put on the page—and what to save for later.