Amara: Market Spotlight

For this week's market spotlight, we look at Amara, a single-title romance imprint of Entangled Publishing.
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Amara is an imprint of Entangled Publishing focused on new upmarket single-title romance titles. They use digital-first and traditional publishing models and cover a range of romantic genres, including contemporary, science fiction, paranormal, and historical.

(Find other Spotlight Markets here.)

As far as the difference between category and single-title romance novels, the Amara editors say, "Category romances are generally stripped down to the core romance. They're shorter (45k-65k), trope-driven, and often follow a set of 'rules' dictated by the imprint/line on which they're published. Single-title romances have a longer word count (75k-100k, on average), more secondary characters, subplots, and are the kind of books you'll linger over and savor—not just because of the longer word count, but because of the emotional depth and rich world-building."

Amara: Market Spotlight

What They're Looking For

Amara is seeking novels in the following romantic fiction subgenres: contemporary, historical, romantic suspense and thrillers, science fiction, paranormal, and fantasy. Submissions should be high concept, contain romantic elements, be geared to an adult audience, run 70,000-120,000 words (with the exception of contemporary, which should be under 90k), and involve male-female, male-male, or female-female romance.

(6 lessons for writers from Bridgerton: The Duke & I, by Julia Quinn.)

The editors add, "We enjoy connected books with series potential!"

How to Submit

Potential authors can submit via Amara's Submittable account.

Click here to learn more and submit.

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