WD Poetic Form Challenge: Minute Poem Results

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With the next poetic form challenge just around the corner, here are the results of the Writer's Digest Poetic Form Challenge for the minute poem. Nearly 30 poems made the original cut, so it was difficult getting down to a Top 10 list and eventual winner, but here we are.

Read all the minute poems in the comments here.

Here is the winner:

Summons, by Taylor Graham

What is that soft uncanny light
that wakes at night?
It seems to bloom
in my small room,

to wander down the waiting hall--
no muffled call,
but just the wink
of light, a blink

and I'm alone with only dark;
a dwindling spark
that tweaks the mind:
"come find, come find..."

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Congratulations, Taylor! I love the soft mystery of this poem.

Here’s a complete look at my Top 10 list:

  1. Summons, by Taylor Graham
  2. Falling Leaves, by James Von Hendy
  3. Hiking Amish Country, by Pat Anthony
  4. Getting Clues, by Walt Wojtanik
  5. Fade to Winter, by Lisa L. Stead
  6. Verbose, by Beverly Finney
  7. Forget Those Dreams, by RL Hodges
  8. Remembrance, by Jane Shlensky
  9. Heavenly, by Tracy Davidson
  10. Classic Moment, by Nancy Posey

Congratulations to everyone in the Top 10! And to everyone who wrote a minute poem!

Look for the next poetic form and challenge just around the corner.

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Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer’s Digest Writing Community, which means he maintains this blog, edits a couple Market Books (Poet’s Market and Writer’s Market), writes a poetry column for Writer’s Digest magazine, leads online education, speaks around the country on publishing and poetry, and a lot of other fun writing-related stuff.

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He loves learning new (to him) poetic forms and trying out new poetic challenges. He is also the author of Solving the World’s Problems.

Follow him on Twitter @RobertLeeBrewer.

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