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WD Poetic Form Challenge: Decima Results

The competition--as usual--was tight, but I've emerged from the decima challenge with a winner and Top 10 list. It took a few rounds to get there, but here we are with the decima results.

Read all the decimas in the comments here.

Here is the winner:

Check-Out, by Pedro Poitevin

I give to the receptionist
the invoice where I've inked this note.
She reads. She smiles. She clears her throat,
then coyly tells me I'll be missed,
but hard though it is to resist
my script--yes, she does wonder when
it is I've planned to come again--
the Hilton won't oblige a bard.
Yet if I yield my credit card,
I'm welcome to show off my pen.

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Poets will learn the basic definition of a platform (and why it’s important), tools for cultivating a readership, how to define goals and set priorities, how to find readers without distracting from your writing, and more!

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Congratulations, Pedro! I love how the humor of this decima.

Here’s a complete look at my Top 10 list:

  1. Check-Out, by Pedro Poitevin
  2. Globe of matter, by Daniel Ari
  3. Imagine That, by Candace Kubinec
  4. Gazing up to the Heavens on a Summer Day, by Linda Hofke
  5. The Prophet of the Median Strip, by RJ Clarken
  6. Water Mirage, by Taylor Graham
  7. Falling, by Tracy Davidson
  8. Pyrotechnics Guild International Convention 2015, by ReathaThomasOakley
  9. "I will be your long lost lover," by Sasha A. Palmer
  10. The Decima Peacock, by Charise M. Hoge

Congratulations to everyone in the Top 10! And to everyone who wrote a decima!

Look for the next poetic form and challenge just around the corner.

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Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer’s Digest Writing Community, which means he maintains this blog, edits a couple Market Books (Poet’s Market and Writer’s Market), writes a poetry column for Writer’s Digest magazine, leads online education, speaks around the country on publishing and poetry, and a lot of other fun writing-related stuff.

roberttwitterimage

He loves learning new (to him) poetic forms and trying out new poetic challenges. He is also the author of Solving the World’s Problems.

Follow him on Twitter @RobertLeeBrewer.

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