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2022 April PAD Challenge: Day 18

Write a poem every day of April with the 2022 April Poem-A-Day Challenge. For today's prompt, write a We Blank poem.

Hopefully you don't run into this problem, but if you hit a wall at any point during this month's challenge, I've found that using poetic forms can sometimes help shake a poem or three loose. Here's a list of 10 short poetic forms to try.

For today's prompt, take the phrase "We (blank)," replace the blank with a word or phrase, make the new phrase the title of your poem, and then, write your poem. Possible titles might include: "We the People," "We Want It Now," "We in the Royal Sense," and/or "We vs. Wii."

Remember: These prompts are springboards to creativity. Use them to expand your possibilities, not limit them.

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The Complete Guide of Poetic Forms

Play with poetic forms!

Poetic forms are fun poetic games, and this digital guide collects more than 100 poetic forms, including more established poetic forms (like sestinas and sonnets) and newer invented forms (like golden shovels and fibs).

Click to continue.

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Here’s my attempt at a We Blank Poem:

"We Shouldn't Be Doing This"

We shouldn't be doing this
on a day like today or yesterday
or tomorrow. Honestly, we should
be doing something else somewhere
else, but who's going to tell us when or
where to do something somewhere anyway?

Anyway, we don't have anything anywhere
to do or anyone to tell us any different
and if there were somewhere else
I'd rather be I can't think where
that somewhere else might
be for us doing this--

this thing we shouldn't be doing.

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