2017 April PAD Challenge: Day 8

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Wish me luck! I'm going to run a 10K later this morning in Austin, Texas (not affiliated with the Austin International Poetry Festival). If I go silent for Day 9, something went horribly wrong during the race.

For today's prompt, write a panic poem. There are any number of things a person can panic about, including severe weather, military invasions, or what to wear to an event. And while some may be more life or death than others, that feeling of panic is just as real for a person who has to get up and speak in front of a crowd of smiling strangers as it is for a person hiding in the basement of their house as a tornado approaches.

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Here’s my attempt at a Panic Poem:

“never slowing down”

she says slow down
& to quit running around
like a chicken with his head cut off
but i can't help it

there are times when i feel
deep down in the depths of my soul
that i am in fact
a chicken with his head cut off

& it does no good to say
everything will turn out fine
because panic is personal
& this panic is mine

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Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer’s Digest Writing Community and author of Solving the World’s Problems (Press 53). He has often been called a rock, someone who keeps his head, but he has his panic moments the same as all human beings.

Follow him on Twitter @RobertLeeBrewer.

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