Publish date:

Evoke vs. Invoke (Grammar Rules)

Let's look at the differences between evoke and invoke with Grammar Rules from the Writer's Digest editors, including a few examples of correct usages.

This week's grammar rules post looks at two words that are often confused with each other: evoke and invoke. In fact, some dictionary editors have thrown up their hands and agreed with public perception that these two terms are similes. But I'd like to make the case that they are different.

(5 Tips for Evoking Emotion in Writing.)

So let's look at the differences between evoke and invoke and when to use each.

Evoke vs. Invoke (Grammar Rules)

Evoke vs. Invoke

Evoke is a verb that means to provoke an emotion; call forth a thought, memory, or feeling; or recreate with imagination. For instance, the mention of pumpkins and corn mazes might evoke a sense of autumn for some people.

(Emotion vs. Feeling: How to Evoke More From Readers.)

Invoke, on the other hand, is a verb that refers to the action of calling upon someone or something to help or support in some endeavor. For instance, a person may invoke a genie to grant them three wishes. A person may also invoke their rights to protect themselves in a court of law.

Make sense?

Here are a few examples of evoke and invoke:

Correct: The opening paragraph of Ray Bradbury's The Halloween Tree evokes a sense of my hometown.
Incorrect: The opening paragraph of Ray Bradbury's The Halloween Tree invokes a sense of my hometown.

Correct: Laura invoked a spirit to help ace her math test.
Incorrect: Laura evoked a spirit to help ace her math test.

I was saddened to see that some places make evoke and invoke similes, because these two words evoke very distinct and unique meanings for me. I invoke all who read this post to help keep them that way.

*****

Grammar and Mechanics

No matter what type of writing you do, mastering the fundamentals of grammar and mechanics is an important first step to having a successful writing career.

Click to continue.

NaNoWriMo: Making the Most of Community

NaNoWriMo: Making the Most of Community

Books, much like children, sometimes take a village. Let managing editor and fellow WriMo participant Moriah Richard give you tips for engaging with your online and in-person NaNoWriMo community.

From Script

Film and TV Show Reviews and Writing What You Know (From Script)

In this week’s round up brought to us by Script magazine, Script contributor Tom Stempel reviews the latest in film and television show releases, an exclusive interview with Lamb screenwriter Sjón, and much more!

Why We Should Read Middle Grade Fiction as Adults

Why We Should Read Middle Grade Fiction as Adults

Young Adult fiction has surpassed its own demographic by being acceptable to read at any age. Why have we left middle grade fiction out of that equation? Here’s why we should be reading middle grade fiction as adults and as writers.

What Are the 6 Different Types of Editing?

What Are the 6 Different Types of Editing?

When you reach the editing phase of your manuscript, it's important to know what kind of editing you're looking for in particular. Author Tiffany Yates breaks down the 6 different types of editing.

WD Poetic Form Challenge

WD Poetic Form Challenge: Imayo Winner

Learn the winner and Top 10 list for the Writer’s Digest Poetic Form Challenge for the imayo.

Writer's Digest 90th Annual Competition Print or Online Article First Place Winner: "Surfacing an Aquatic Diaspora"

Writer's Digest 90th Annual Competition Print or Online Article First Place Winner: "Surfacing an Aquatic Diaspora"

Congratulations to Elaine Howley, first place winner in the Print or Online Article category of the 90th Annual Writer's Digest Writing Competition. Here's her winning article, "Surfacing an Aquatic Diaspora."

Writer's Digest 90th Annual Competition Script (Stage Play or TV/Movie) First Place Winner: "Jaguar Woman"

Writer's Digest 90th Annual Competition Script (Stage Play or TV/Movie) First Place Winner: "Jaguar Woman"

Congratulations to Olga El, first place winner in the Script (Stage Play or TV/Movie) category of the 90th Annual Writer's Digest Writing Competition. Here's her winning TV Pilot script, "Jaguar Woman."

Writer's Digest 90th Annual Competition Non-Rhyming Poetry First Place Winner: "won't you celebrate with me"

Writer's Digest 90th Annual Competition Non-Rhyming Poetry First Place Winner: "won't you celebrate with me"

Congratulations to Nicole Adabunu, first place winner in the Non-Rhyming Poetry category of the 90th Annual Writer's Digest Writing Competition. Here's her winning poem, "won't you celebrate with me."

Writer's Digest 90th Annual Competition Rhyming Poetry First Place Winner: "She Lives in Underbridge World"

Writer's Digest 90th Annual Competition Rhyming Poetry First Place Winner: "She Lives in Underbridge World"

Congratulations to MF Slattery, first place winner in the Rhyming Poetry category of the 90th Annual Writer's Digest Writing Competition. Here's the winning poem, "She Lives in Underbridge World"