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Your Story #112: Vote now!

Write the opening line to a story based on the photo prompt below. (One sentence only.) You can be poignant, funny, witty, etc.; it is, after all, your story.
Photo from Getty

Photo from Getty

  • Prompt: Write the opening line to a story based on the prompt above. (One sentence only.) You can be poignant, funny, witty, etc. It is, after all, your story. 

Email your submission to yourstorycontest@aimmedia.com with the subject line "Your Story 112." 

No attachments, please. Include your name and mailing address. Entries without a name or mailing address with be disqualified.

Unfortunately, we cannot respond to every entry we receive, due to volume. No confirmation emails will be sent out to confirm receipt of submission. But be assured all submissions received before entry deadline are considered carefully. Official Rules

Entry Deadline: CLOSED

Out of nearly 300 entries, WD editors chose the following 12 finalists. Vote for your favorite entry using the poll at the bottom of the page.

1

The first time I became aware of my impending insanity was when I saw a black horse's head, marked with a long, white blaze, instead of a waterfall.

2

At the end of the breakup, he sarcastically laughed, "you'll be up a creek, lost in uncharted water."...and all I could think was yeah.. like, that's a bad thing? 

3

Under the waterfall, about a mile past the river canyon you’ll find the rest of the survivors; that was the last thing my father ever said to me.

4

As the two lovers approached, the thundering of the waterfall was overcome by the roar of a creature long believed to be extinct.

5

The reservoir of the past forever recreates the wellspring of the present; we found ourselves there, traveling the river of time.

6

“No man’s going to tell me what I can and can’t do,” thought Lilith, as she rowed away from Eden in her self-made boat, the serpent coiled at her feet, and the hull full of ripe red apples.

7

It was dizzying to contemplate that the stone-cut river he now traversed had only been carved a few days previously by the Great Serpent.

8

As their rowboat slipped through the Emerald Passage and carried them into exile, Arren stared downward while Sera gazed wistfully at the evergreen beauty of their home one final time.

9

You can say anything you want about nature's beauty and healing power, but if my hair gets wet, you are a dead man.

10

Thousands of eyeless skulls peered up at Adrian from beneath the water's surface as he rowed, careful to make as little noise as possible lest he alert the Keeper of the Valley of Souls to his intrusion.

11

Meriwether Smith and William Jones’ dreams of discovering an uncharted utopia were shattered when the source of the waterfall ahead turned out to be a drain pipe

12

Under the ever-watchful eye of Interpol, it was Ben and Suzie’s first vacation together since the Sahara incident of 1991.

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