Writing Prompt: When things go wrong at the tourist trap.

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WRITING PROMPT: Trapped TouristStrikes Back

Feel

free to take the following prompt home or post a
response (500 words or fewer, funny, sad or stirring) in the Comments section below.
By posting, you’ll be automatically entered in our
occasional around-the-office swag drawings.
If
you’re having trouble with the
captcha code sticking, e-mail your piece and the prompt to me at
writersdigest@fwmedia.com, with “Promptly” in the subject line, and I’ll
make sure it gets up.

It's the ultimate tourist trap. And right now, you have to break in to get your belongings back. Reveal in scene how they got there—and how you reclaim them.

As for those swag drawings mentioned above, on Friday I rounded up all the names of the writers who posted stories in the last month or so, and using my random bias-eradicating technology (dipping hand into bowl with names), a winner emerged: Tom Tangretti. Tom will be taking home a stack of interoffice swag featuring magazines, and nonfiction and fiction books.

As always, many, many thanks to everyone who posted a story—or stories—in the last month. You make the Promptly world go round.

--


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10 bestsellers, from Jodi Picoult to Chuck Palahniuk, offer top 10
lists on the writing life; 10 ways to use hurt and anger to fuel your writing; 10
Tips for Delivering a Killer Reading; 10-Minute Fixes to 10 Common Plot
Problems. Click here to check out the Big 10 issue of Writer's Digest magazine.

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