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Weekend Writing Challenge: The Tweet That Changed Everything


Hi writers,

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Freaky Friday/The Weird Week in Writing series is taking a holiday this week because we’re headed out for our annual trip to WD’s clandestine brainstorming headquarters (read: the editor’s house) to strategize and plan the 2011 calendar of the magazine.

Here’s to hoping you have an excellent weekend. And don’t forget—interoffice swag drawing next week! The stacks of books and magazines on my desk are towering, and I may be seriously injured unless we start shipping them out …

(Image: Via)

* * *

WRITING PROMPT: Tweet Tirade
Feel

free to take the following prompt home or post a
response (500
words or fewer, funny, sad or stirring) in the Comments section below.
By posting, you’ll be automatically entered in our
occasional around-the-office swag drawings.
If
you’re having trouble with the
captcha code sticking, e-mail your piece and the prompt to me at
writersdigest@fwmedia.com, with “Promptly” in the subject line, and I’ll
make sure it gets up.

Based on a particular tweet or Facebook status update, your character
makes an important—and critical—life decision. Show the decision in
scene, or show what your character has decided to do in the wake of it.

--


A
feature package on how to write and sell your
memoir. Interviews with Lifeof Pi author Yann Martel, and
the scribe behind “True Blood,” Charlaine Harris. The results of our
Pop Fiction competition. New markets for your work. For more, click

here to check the July/August 2010 issue of WD out.

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