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The Iowa Review: Market Spotlight

For this week's market spotlight, we look at The Iowa Review, a literary magazine looking for "the best poetry, fiction, and nonfiction being written today." Submission period for unsolicited work open through the end of November, 2020.

The Iowa Review is a literary magazine looking for poetry, fiction, and nonfiction. It was founded in 1970 and is edited by faculty, students, and staff from the writing and literature programs at the University of Iowa.

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(The Sun Magazine: Market Spotlight.)

The editors say, "We publish a wide range of fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, translations, photography, and work in emerging forms by both established and emerging writers. Work from our pages has been consistently selected to appear in the anthologies Best American Essays, Best American Short Stories, Best American Poetry, The Pushcart Prize: Best of the Small Presses, and The PEN/O. Henry Prize Stories."

Pays $1.50 per line for poetry ($40 minimum payment); and 8¢ per word for prose ($100 minimum payment).

What They're Looking For

The Iowa Review will consider unsolicited submissions of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction during the fall semester of September, October, and November.

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The editors say, "The Iowa Review looks for the best poetry, fiction, and nonfiction being written today and is often pleased to introduce new writers."

(Check out a mini-interview with Lynne Nugent, Managing Editor of The Iowa Review in the September/October 2020 issue of Writer's Digest.)

Writers can submit up to 25 pages (double-spaced) for prose and up to eight pages for poetry.

How to Submit

Potential writers should submit via their Submittable page (there is a $4 fee for online submissions) or by post to the appropriate editor at: The Iowa Review, 308 EPB, University of Iowa, Iowa City IA 52242.

Click here to learn more and submit.

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