What Do You Hope to Achieve With Your Writing: From Our Readers (Comment for a Chance at Publication)

This post announces our latest From Our Readers question: What do you hope to achieve with your writing? Comment for a chance at publication in a future issue of Writer's Digest.
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This post announces our latest From Our Readers question: What do you hope to achieve with your writing? Comment for a chance at publication in a future issue of Writer's Digest.

Our upcoming September/October issue is focused on the future and what the future might look like for writing and publishing. So we would love to know what you picture for yourself when considering your writing future.

From Our Readers

Our formal question: What do you hope to achieve with your writing?

Are you trying to write a book? Do you want to get published? Make a living (or supplement your income) as a writer? Perhaps, you're writing to help understand yourself or make people laugh. There are no right or wrong answers, because these are your aspirations. 

Share your answers with us in the comments below for a chance to be published in the September/October issue of Writer's Digest.

Here are the guidelines:

  • Provide an answer to the question "What do you hope to achieve with your writing?" in the comments below.
  • Answers can be funny, weird, poignant, thought-provoking, entertaining, etc.
  • Remember to include your name as you would like it to appear in print.
  • Deadline for commenting this time around is July 6, 2020.
  • Only comments shared below will be considered for publication, though feel free to share your answers on social media with the following hashtags: #WDReaders and #WritingAchievement.

Note on commenting: If you wish to comment on the site, go to Disqus to create a free new account, verify your account on this site below (one-time thing), and then comment away.

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