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What Book Ended in a Way That You Didn’t Expect but Was Perfect Anyway?: From Our Readers (Comment for a Chance at Publication)

This post announces our latest From Our Readers question: What book ended in a way that you didn’t expect but was perfect anyway? Comment for a chance at publication in a future issue of Writer's Digest.
From Our Readers

Our formal question: What book ended in a way that you didn’t expect but was perfect anyway?

Do story endings have to be satisfying?

Simple answer: No, of course not. An ending can go against a reader's desires or expectations while still honoring the story and the characters in a way that resonates with readers.

It's hard to talk about endings without spoiling them, but a perfect example of what I'm talking about is More Happy Than Not by Adam Silvera. When I tell you that this book wrecked me, I am not exaggerating. Like, full-on sobbing, howling, cursing kind of denial happened in my household. When I reread this book, my heart still rails against what it knows is going to happen. And yet, it's one of my favorite books. Why? because the story is honest, the characters heartfelt, and the ending echoes long after you finish reading it. Truly, it's a masterpiece, even though it's not satisfying in the way we might expect from our books.

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Sometimes a book ends, and it isn't what you wanted or expected for the characters. But after thinking about it, it's actually the ending that makes the most sense, that's in fact, exactly what needed to happen. Have you written or read a book where that's true? What is it and (without spoiling newer books) why was it a perfect ending?

Share your answers with us in the comments below for a chance to be published in the November/December 2022 issue of Writer's Digest. Here are the guidelines:

  • Provide an answer to the question " What book or short story with a sinister tone has had a lasting impact on you as a reader or writer?" in the comments below.
  • Answers can be funny, weird, poignant, thought-provoking, entertaining, etc.
  • Remember to include your name as you would like it to appear in print.
  • Deadline for commenting this time around is August 5, 2022.
  • Only comments shared below will be considered for publication, though feel free to share your answers on social media and tag us @WritersDigest

Note on commenting: If you wish to comment on the site, go to Disqus to create a free new account, verify your account on this site below (one-time thing), and then comment away.

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