Plot Twist Story Prompts: Take a Trip

Every good story needs a nice (or not so nice) turn or two to keep it interesting. This week, have a character take a trip somewhere.
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Plot twist story prompts aren't meant for the beginning or the end of stories. Rather, they're for forcing big and small turns in the anticipated trajectory of a story. This is to make it more interesting for the readers and writers alike.

Each week, I'll provide a new prompt to help twist your story. Find last week's prompt, Moment of Doubt, here.

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Plot Twist Story Prompts: Take a Trip

For today's prompt, have a character take a trip somewhere. It could be as small as walking to the local convenience store for some milk or as exotic as a trip to a foreign land. The point is to start in one location and move to another.

(How to Map Your Fantasy World.)

Travel itself necessitates change in the plot, and locale is definitely something to consider. But don't stop there. Consider how the travel occurs. Is it by plane, train, or automobile? Carriage, balloon, or rickshaw? Perhaps on foot or horseback? Mode of transport can play a big role in how it impacts the story.

For instance, traveling by bus may give your character the opportunity to strike up a conversation with another character. However, it's hard to converse with someone while rolling down the interstate on a Harley. Speaking of which, a character on a Harley may give off different vibes than someone on a moped or bicycle.

Whether your characters are on a boat or pogo stick, have them strike out on a trip and see where it leads them and your story.

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