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Come West With Us: Writer’s Digest Conference West in Los Angeles (Oct. 19-21, 2012)

Big News: For the first time ever Writer's Digest is packing up its writing and publishing knowledge and heading to Hollywood (no, they aren't making a movie about us … yet). We're bringing our Writer's Digest Conference to the West Coast (why should only East Coast writers have all the fun?) and we want you there. Here's the scoop ...

Big News: For the first time ever Writer's Digest is packing up its writing and publishing knowledge and heading to Hollywood (no, they aren't making a movie about us … yet). We're bringing our Writer's Digest Conference to the West Coast (why should only East Coast writers have all the fun?) and we want you there. Here's the scoop:

Event: Writer's Digest Conference West
When: October 19-21
Where: Hollywood, CA (Loews Hollywood Hotel & Spa)
Why You Should Attend: Writers looking to write better, get published and connect with agents.
Highlight: The Pitch Slam, where you get one-on-one pitch meetings with agents.

Register now for the Writer's Digest Conference West.

Here's the full rub:

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DETAILS

Join us at the Renaissance Hollywood Hotel & Spa in Los Angeles, CA, October 19 – 21, 2012, for all of the informative sessions you’ve come to love from WD Conference, now on the West Coast. Register now and start making your travel plans today. If you register before July 19, 2012, you can get an early bird discount.

This is the first year for a West Coast WD Conference, and we’re excited to bring you the very best sessions, speakers and publishing advice, set against inspiring views of Los Angeles. Get real-world advice on getting published in today’s ever-changing market, with a focus on sharpening your writing skills, polishing your pitch and selling your work.

THE PITCH SLAM

Be sure to attend the Pitch Slam, a fast-paced, three-hour event with agents who are actively looking for new writers to represent. We’re adding new agents every day and expect to have at least 20 in attendance.

GET THIS: To date, at least 8 writers who have attended past WD events have told us they signed with agents they pitched at the Pitch Slam. If that isn’t enough reason to come, I do not know what is. The Pitch Slam unquestionably works. Start on the conference website and click on “Success Stories” on the right side.

Who’s Speaking?

Learn from the best at this year’s Writer’s Digest Conference West. Get helpful insights from bestselling authors and award-winning writers like James Scott Bell, Steven James, Elizabeth Sims and many others, plus well-known industry experts.

Ask the Agent Panel
Friday, October 19 · 5:10 – 6:30 pm
This is a Q&A session for you to ask literary agents practically any publishing question. Find out what they really think about query letters, live pitches, self-publishing and more.

Crafting the Perfect Pitch
Friday, October 19 · 6:40 – 7:30 pm
Attending the Pitch Slam? This is a can’t-miss session. Get insights on how to perfectly prep your pitch (and your work) and learn how to get comfortable and stay confident so you can make a great first impression.

A Self-Publishing Author’s Guide to Contracts with Dana Newman
Sunday, October 21 · 10:00 – 10:50 am
Thinking about going it alone? This session is critical for authors who are looking for success in the self-publishing world. Learn details about the basics and the fine points of literary agency agreements, collaboration agreements and much more.

Register for these, and all of our other sessions here.

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