9 Elizabeth Berg Quotes About Writing for Writers

To celebrate the release of her newest novel, The Confession Club, here are 9 Elizabeth Berg quotes about writing from her 2010 WD interview.
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To celebrate the release of her newest novel, The Confession Club, here are 9 Elizabeth Berg quotes about writing from her 2010 WD interview.

Elizabeth Berg, author of such novels as Open House and The Story of Arthur Truluv, spoke with WD's Jessica Strawser in 2010 about how being selected for an Oprah Book Club pick can change things for a writer, when to take the advice of others, and when she considers the reader in her writing process. Today, Berg's newest book, The Confession Club, hits bookstore shelves and to celebrate, here are nine Elizabeth Berg quotes from the 2010 interview about writing.

Read the full, extended interview, featuring some surprising and hilarious revelations, here.

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In the most self-protective of ways, I don’t think about the reader when I’m writing. I just think about the story. After it’s done, I think a lot about the reader. –Elizabeth Berg, Writer’s Digest March/April 2010

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But in the end, always, you need to write what’s in your heart and soul, and let the chips fall where they may. –Elizabeth Berg, Writer’s Digest March/April 2010

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… If you do write what’s true for you, and someone doesn’t like it, well, you know, that stings for a minute, but it goes away. –Elizabeth Berg, Writer’s Digest March/April 2010

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I love doing dialogue. I love hearing what these people are going to say to each other—and again, I don’t know what they’re going to say. I feel like I’m the eavesdropper, the person who transcribes what these characters say. –Elizabeth Berg, Writer’s Digest March/April 2010

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If I could say anything to aspiring writers, it’s to keep your own counsel, first and foremost. –Elizabeth Berg, Writer’s Digest March/April 2010

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The process of writing and creating and answering that very unique call inside yourself has nothingto do with agents and sales and all that. –Elizabeth Berg, Writer’s Digest March/April 2010

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I would like people to find reading me to be a pleasure and to be a little surprising. –Elizabeth Berg, Writer’s Digest March/April 2010

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I try not to read like a writer, and I find that my editorial self is intruding more often than I would like it to. … But I want to read like a reader. I want to get lost in a book. –Elizabeth Berg, Writer’s Digest March/April 2010

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But for the most part, because I do love writing, I look upon editorial suggestions as opportunities. And they can really enrich the material. –Elizabeth Berg, Writer’s Digest March/April 2010

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